Cognitive Science RSS Feed

Cognitive Science

Cognitive science information and blogs.
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Polina Anikeeva explores ways to make neural probes that are compatible with delicate biological tissues.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences

Emery N. Brown explains how statistics and neuroscience improve anesthesiology at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


Whitehead Institute researchers are using a modified CRISPR/Cas9-guided activation strategy to investigate the most frequent cause of intellectual disability in males.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


Authors: Speed LJ, Majid A Abstract Do we mentally simulate olfactory information? We investigated mental simulation of odors and sounds in two experiments. Participants retained a word while they smelled an odor or heard a sound, then rated odor/sound intensity and recalled the word. Later odor/sound recognition was also tested, and pleasantness and familiarity judgments were collected. Word recall was slower when the sound and sound-word mismatched (e.g., bee sound with the word...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Lowder MW, Choi W, Ferreira F, Henderson JM Abstract What are the effects of word-by-word predictability on sentence processing times during the natural reading of a text? Although information complexity metrics such as surprisal and entropy reduction have been useful in addressing this question, these metrics tend to be estimated using computational language models, which require some degree of commitment to a particular theory of language processing. Taking a different...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com




Nicky Case (of Explorable Explanations and Parable of the Polygons internet fame) has a fantastic essay which picks up on the theme of my last Cyberselves post – technology as companion, not competitor. In How To Become A Centaur Case gives blitz history of AI, and of its lesser known cousin IA – Intelligence Augmentation. … Continue reading "How To Become A Centaur"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

Authors: Montag JL, Jones MN, Smith LB Abstract The words in children's language learning environments are strongly predictive of cognitive development and school achievement. But how do we measure language environments and do so at the scale of the many words that children hear day in, day out? The quantity and quality of words in a child's input are typically measured in terms of total amount of talk and the lexical diversity in that talk. There are disagreements in the literature...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Nicenboim B, Vasishth S, Engelmann F, Suckow K Abstract Given the replication crisis in cognitive science, it is important to consider what researchers need to do in order to report results that are reliable. We consider three changes in current practice that have the potential to deliver more realistic and robust claims. First, the planned experiment should be divided into two stages, an exploratory stage and a confirmatory stage. This clear separation allows the researcher...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

MIT senior and Marshall Scholar Liang Zhou wants to elucidate the neural basis for our thoughts and intuitions.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


Authors: Metz SE, Weisberg DS, Weisberg M Abstract Why is evolutionary theory controversial among members of the American public? We propose a novel explanation: allegiance to different criteria for belief. In one interview study, two online surveys, and one nationally representative phone poll, we found that evolutionists and creationists take different justifications for belief as legitimate. Those who accept evolution emphasize empirical evidence and scientific consensus....

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Mozuraitis M, Stevenson S, Heller D Abstract While speakers have been shown to adapt to the knowledge state of their addressee in choosing referring expressions, they often also show some egocentric tendencies. The current paper aims to provide an explanation for this "mixed" behavior by presenting a model that derives such patterns from the probabilistic combination of both the speaker's and the addressee's perspectives. To test our model, we conducted a language production...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

This study investigated collaborative problem solving, focusing on a group member interacting with another member having a different perspective (a "maverick"). It was predicted that mavericks might mitigate disadvantages and facilitate perspective taking during problem solving. Thus, 344 university students participated in two laboratory-based experiments by engaging in a simple rule-discovery task that raised conflicts among perspectives. They interacted with virtual partners whose...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

We present a self-organizing approach to sentence processing that sheds new light on notional plurality effects in agreement attraction, using pseudopartitive subject noun phrases (e.g., a bottle of pills). We first show that notional plurality ratings (numerosity judgments for subject noun phrases) predict verb agreement choices in pseudopartitives, in line with the "Marking" component of the Marking and Morphing theory of agreement processing. However, no account to date has derived notional...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

A talk I gave titled “Debating Sex Differences in Cognition: We Can Do Better” now has a home on the web. The pages align a rough transcript of the talk with the slides, for your browsing pleasure. Mindhacks.com readers will recognise many of the slides, which started their lives as blog posts. The full series … Continue reading "Debating Sex Differences: Talk transcript"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: gender

Authors: Cutting JE, Armstrong KL Abstract Hollywood movies can be deeply engaging and easy to understand. To succeed in this manner, feature-length movies employ many editing techniques with strong psychological underpinnings. We explore the origins and development of one of these, the reaction shot. This shot typically shows a single, unspeaking character with modest facial expression in response to an event or to the behavior or speech of another character. In a sample of movies...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Nichols S, Strohminger N, Rai A, Garfield J Abstract It is an old philosophical idea that if the future self is literally different from the current self, one should be less concerned with the death of the future self (Parfit, ). This paper examines the relation between attitudes about death and the self among Hindus, Westerners, and three Buddhist populations (Lay Tibetan, Lay Bhutanese, and monastic Tibetans). Compared with other groups, monastic Tibetans gave particularly...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

The backfire effect is when correcting misinformation hardens, rather than corrects, someone’s mistaken belief. It’s a relative of so called ‘attitude polarisation’ whereby people’s views on politically controversial topics can get more, not less, extreme when they are exposed to counter-arguments. The finding that misperception are hard to correct is not new – it fits … Continue reading "The backfire effect is elusive"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

Open science essentials in 2 minutes, part 3 Let’s define it this way: reproducibility is when your experiment or data analysis can be reliably repeated. It isn’t replicability, which we can define as reproducing an experiment and subsequent analysis and getting qualitatively similar results with the new data. (These aren’t universally accepted definitions, but they … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: Reproducibility"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

In ‘The Human Advantage: How Our Brains Became Remarkable’, Suzana Herculano-Houzel weaves together two stories: the story of her scientific career, based on her invention of a new technique for counting the number of brain cells in an entire brain, and the story of human brain evolution. Previously counts of neurons in brains of humans … Continue reading "The Human Advantage"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: books

A review called ‘The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories‘ sets out a theory of why individuals end up believing Elvis is alive, NASA faked the moon landings or 9/11 was an inside job. Karen Douglas and colleagues suggest: Belief in conspiracy theories appears to be driven by motives that can be characterized as epistemic (understanding one’s … Continue reading "Conspiracy theories as maladaptive coping"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

We’re happy to announce the re-launch of our project ‘Cyberselves: How Immersive Technologies Will Impact Our Future Selves’. Straight out of Sheffield Robotics, the project aims to explore the effects of technology like robot avatars, virtual reality, AI servants and other tech which alters your perception or ability to act. We’re interested in work, play … Continue reading "Cyberselves: How Immersive Technologies Will Impact Our Future Selves"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: news

The Kardashian index is a semi-humorous metric invented to the reveal how much trust you should put in a scientist with a public image. In ‘The Kardashian index: a measure of discrepant social media profile for scientists‘, the author writes: I am concerned that phenomena similar to that of Kim Kardashian may also exist … Continue reading "Scientific Credibility and The Kardashian Index"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: nonsense

Open science essentials in 2 minutes, part 2 The Open Science Framework (osf.io) is a website designed for the complete life-cycle of your research project – designing projects; collaborating; collecting, storing and sharing data; sharing analysis scripts, stimuli, results and publishing results. You can read more about the rationale for the site here. Open Science … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: The Open Science Framework"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

Open Science essentials in 2 minutes, part 1 The Problem As a scholarly community we allowed ourselves to forget the distinction between exploratory vs confirmatory research, presenting exploratory results as confirmatory, presenting post-hoc rationales as predictions. As well as being dishonest, this makes for unreliable science. Flexibility in how you analyse your data (“researcher degrees … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: pre-registration"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

While lavender aromatherapy has been documented to reduce stress in humans, little is known about its potential for reducing stress in veterinary medicine. Horses can develop elevated heart rates and stress hormone levels when they are confined to horse trailers and transported to new competition venues. Therapies to reduce stress in competition horses are regulated…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, biotecnologia, science, simulation

Researchers at the University of Cambridge in Britain recently studied ‘willpower’ in pet Labrador retrievers. After allowing each dog to smell a hot dog, the researchers placed the hot dog in a hamster cage and sealed it shut with duct tape. While some dogs showed only mild interest in the sealed-up hot dog, others were fixated on…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, deus, diaspora, eel, jornalismo cientã­fico

Dr. Kenneth Catania from Vanderbilt University presented his work with star-nosed moles at the Experimental Biology meeting last month in Chicago. These animals are really cool. Here are some facts from Dr. Catania about these crazy-looking creatures you may not know: If participating in a bug-eating contest, they would win hands down every time because they are the…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, alan ball

Protecting babies and children against dangerous — sometimes fatal — diseases is a core mission of public health. Everyday, in health departments across the nation, someone is working on maintaining and improving childhood vaccination rates and keeping diseases like measles and mumps from regaining a foothold in the U.S.

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: conference chatter, drugs, geekalicious, the loony bin called academia, web 2.0, new media, and gadgets, what did they say about "balance," again?, open science, parents, regulamentacao, science festival, subdisciplines

Here are the highlights from the final day of the meeting: Carbon monoxide (CO) is not all that bad: Michael Tift, graduate student at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, described how the body naturally produces CO when red blood cells are broken down and CO can actually be protective against inflammation at low doses. His research was…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, 42, douglas adams, estrelas, italy, ke$hia, mouse ova

The August Krogh Distinguished lecture was awarded to Dr. Warren Burggren, who gave a fantastic lecture on epigenetics, or modifications to gene expression. He discussed how epigenetic changes to our genes are reversible. So when a stimulus like hypoxia changes our genes, these epigenetic changes to the genes go away rather quickly when the hypoxic insult…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, beauty, blog behavior

Dopamine is an important hormone released from neurons involved in reward pathways. Researchers at Cornell University wanted to know if dopamine signaling was involved in how birds learn songs. Their findings, recently published in Science, present evidence that neurons in the brain of zebra finches do in fact decrease dopamine signals when the birds hear an…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, medicina baseada em evidãªncias, science popularization, tel aviv

A new article published in Physiological Reviews compared some remarkable similarities and differences between naked mole rats and humans. Both are relatively long-lived, highly social and have low natural selection pressures. But, this is about all they have in common. While humans are prone to developing age-related cancer, diabetes, heart disease and dementias, naked mole rats…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, adipocytes, epidemic intelligence service, science in college

Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind is a new book on cultural evolution in humans from a biological perspective. This is an interesting book and a good book, and I recommend it, but I need to add a strong caveat. The author could have made a more compelling argument had he more…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: in other news, baldwin effect, brain evolution, evolution of culture

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via GIPHY A new article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presents the discovery of a species of frog with fluorescence. The South American polka dot tree frog, aka Hypsiboas punctatus is already rather cute under normal light. But when exposed to UV light, this frog really shines. It gets its glowing personality from…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, tents in unusual places


Fake news is everywhere, but why we believe it is still unclear. Psychologists suggest that valuing our identity more than our accuracy is what leads us to accept incorrect information that aligns with our political party's beliefs. This value discrepancy can explain why high-quality news sources are no longer enough--and understanding it can help us find strategies to bridge the political divide.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

There's nothing wrong with being a little weird. Because we think of psychological disorders on a continuum, we may worry when our own ways of thinking and behaving don't match up with our idealized notion of health. But some variability can be healthy and even adaptive, say researchers, even though it can also complicate attempts to identify standardized markers of pathology.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily


A new paper is the first to look at 1,000 years of English development and detect the kinds of algorithms that human minds have used to extend existing words to new senses of meaning. This kind of 'reverse engineering' of how human language has developed could have implications for natural language processing by machines.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging related diseases.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily



Allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation recipients are at a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment in the years post-transplantation, according to a new study. The research helps add a missing piece to a long-unsolved puzzle about post-transplant effects on recipients, specifically that vulnerable subpopulations of similar transplants can benefit from targeted interventions in the years after they receive their lifesaving treatment.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

Our brains are wrinkled like walnuts by the time we are born. Babies born without these wrinkles -- called smooth brain syndrome -- suffer from severe developmental deficiencies and their life expectancy is markedly reduced. Now researchers have developed a method for growing tiny 'brains on chips' from human cells that enabled them to track the physical and biological mechanisms underlying the wrinkling process.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

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