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Cognitive Science

Cognitive science information and blogs.
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Authors: Pitt B, Casasanto D Abstract People implicitly associate different emotions with different locations in left-right space. Which aspects of emotion do they spatialize, and why? Across many studies people spatialize emotional valence, mapping positive emotions onto their dominant side of space and negative emotions onto their non-dominant side, consistent with theories of metaphorical mental representation. Yet other results suggest a conflicting mapping of emotional intensity...

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Authors: Blanchard T, Lombrozo T, Nichols S Abstract Occam's razor-the idea that all else being equal, we should pick the simpler hypothesis-plays a prominent role in ordinary and scientific inference. But why are simpler hypotheses better? One attractive hypothesis known as Bayesian Occam's razor (BOR) is that more complex hypotheses tend to be more flexible-they can accommodate a wider range of possible data-and that flexibility is automatically penalized by Bayesian inference. In...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

"Economies of Experience"-Disambiguation of Degraded Stimuli Leads to a Decreased Dispersion of Eye-Movement Patterns. Cogn Sci. 2017 Nov 20;: Authors: Król ME, Król M Abstract We demonstrate "economies of experience" in eye-movement patterns-that is, optimization of eye-movement patterns aimed at more efficient and less costly visual processing, similar to the priming-induced formation of sparser cortical representations or reduced reaction times. Participants looked at...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Zinszer BD, Rolotti SV, Li F, Li P Abstract Infant language learners are faced with the difficult inductive problem of determining how new words map to novel or known objects in their environment. Bayesian inference models have been successful at using the sparse information available in natural child-directed speech to build candidate lexicons and infer speakers' referential intentions. We begin by asking how a Bayesian model optimized for monolingual input (the Intentional...

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This study examined the time-course of context effects on spoken word recognition during Chinese sentence processing. We recruited 60 native Mandarin listeners to participate in an eye-tracking experiment. In this eye-tracking experiment, listeners were told to listen to a sentence carefully, which ended with a Chinese homophone, and look at different visual probes (Chinese characters or different line-drawing pictures) presented concurrently on the computer screen naturally. Different types...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Neuroscientists find chronic stress skews decisions toward higher-risk options.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


Authors: Reichle ED, Yu L Abstract Our understanding of the cognitive processes involved in reading has been advanced by computational models that simulate those processes (e.g., see Reichle, 2015). Unfortunately, most of these models have been developed to explain the reading of English and other alphabetic languages, with relatively fewer efforts to examine whether or not the assumptions of these models also explain what has been learned from other languages and, in particular,...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

This study integrates mouse cursor motion analysis into affective computing and investigates the idea that movements of the computer cursor can provide information about emotion of the computer user. We extracted 16-26 trajectory features during a choice-reaching task and examined the link between emotion and cursor motions. Participants were induced for positive or negative emotions by music, film clips, or emotional pictures, and they indicated their emotions with questionnaires. Our 10-fold...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

We describe and implement a new model of creating contextual coherence in the visual imagination called Coherencer, based on the SOILIE model of imagination. We show that Coherencer is able to generate scene descriptions that are more coherent than SOILIE's original approach as well as a parallel connectionist algorithm that is considered competitive in the literature on general coherence. We also show that co-occurrence probabilities are a better association representation than holographic...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Open science essentials in 2 minutes, part 2 The Open Science Framework (osf.io) is a website designed for the complete life-cycle of your research project – designing projects; collaborating; collecting, storing and sharing data; sharing analysis scripts, stimuli, results and publishing results. You can read more about the rationale for the site here. Open Science … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: The Open Science Framework"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

Open Science essentials in 2 minutes, part 1 The Problem As a scholarly community we allowed ourselves to forget the distinction between exploratory vs confirmatory research, presenting exploratory results as confirmatory, presenting post-hoc rationales as predictions. As well as being dishonest, this makes for unreliable science. Flexibility in how you analyse your data (“researcher degrees … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: pre-registration"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

This study assessed changes in the structure of his memory skill after around 30 years of essentially no practice on the digit-span task. On the first day of testing, his estimated span was only 10 digits, but over the following 3 days of testing it increased to 19 digits. Further analyses of his recall performance and verbal reports identified which mechanisms of the original memory skill he could retrieve or reacquire over the 3 days of practice. We discuss theoretical implications for the...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Danileiko I, Lee MD Abstract We apply the "wisdom of the crowd" idea to human category learning, using a simple approach that combines people's categorization decisions by taking the majority decision. We first show that the aggregated crowd category learning behavior found by this method performs well, learning categories more quickly than most or all individuals for 28 previously collected datasets. We then extend the approach so that it does not require people to categorize...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com






Before assigning responsibility, our minds simulate alternative outcomes, study shows.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


This piece is based on my talk to the UCL conference ‘The Role of Diagnosis in Clinical Psychology’. It was aimed at an audience of clinical psychologists but should be of interest more widely. I’ve been a long–term critic of psychiatric diagnoses but I’ve become increasingly frustrated by the myths and over-generalisations that get repeated … Continue reading "Why we need to get better at critiquing psychiatric diagnosis"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory, togetherness

There is a movement in mental health to avoid the phrase ‘commit suicide’. It is claimed that the word ‘commit’ refers to a crime and this increases the stigma for what’s often an act of desperation that deserves compassion, rather than condemnation. The Samaritans’ media guidelines discourage using the phrase, advising: “Avoid labelling a death … Continue reading "Should we stop saying ‘commit’ suicide?"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: togetherness

In The Guardian, Nick Davis makes a clear and timely case for affirming The Goldwater Rule. The Rule, which binds members of the American Psychiatric Association, forbids giving an opinion on the mental state of someone you have not examined. The US president’s behaviour has brought the rule back into the public eye, but Davis … Continue reading "Don’t speculate on others’ mental health from afar"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: other people

The Enigma of Reason: A New Theory of Human Understanding, by Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber was published in April, and I have a review in this week’s Times Higher Education. The books follows on and expands on their landmark ‘Why do humans reason? Arguments for an argumentative theory‘, published in 2011 in Behavioral and … Continue reading "The Enigma of Reason (review)"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: books

News reports have been covering a fascinating study on the moral reasoning of ‘terrorists’ published in Nature Human Behaviour but it’s worth being aware of the wider context to understand what it means. Firstly, it’s important to highlight how impressive this study is. The researchers, led by Sandra Baez, managed to complete the remarkably difficult … Continue reading "Not the psychology of Joe average terrorist"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: uncategorized

You feel somebody is looking at you, but you don’t know why. The explanation lies in some intriguing neuroscience and the study of a strange form of brain injury. Something makes you turn and see someone watching you. Perhaps on a busy train, or at night, or when you’re strolling through the park. How did … Continue reading "What triggers that feeling of being watched?"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: seeing

While lavender aromatherapy has been documented to reduce stress in humans, little is known about its potential for reducing stress in veterinary medicine. Horses can develop elevated heart rates and stress hormone levels when they are confined to horse trailers and transported to new competition venues. Therapies to reduce stress in competition horses are regulated…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, biotecnologia, science, simulation

Researchers at the University of Cambridge in Britain recently studied ‘willpower’ in pet Labrador retrievers. After allowing each dog to smell a hot dog, the researchers placed the hot dog in a hamster cage and sealed it shut with duct tape. While some dogs showed only mild interest in the sealed-up hot dog, others were fixated on…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, deus, diaspora, eel, jornalismo cientã­fico

Dr. Kenneth Catania from Vanderbilt University presented his work with star-nosed moles at the Experimental Biology meeting last month in Chicago. These animals are really cool. Here are some facts from Dr. Catania about these crazy-looking creatures you may not know: If participating in a bug-eating contest, they would win hands down every time because they are the…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, alan ball

This new map shows how easily white Europeans associate black faces with negative ideas. Since 2002, hundreds of thousands of people around the world have logged onto a website run by Harvard University called Project Implicit and taken an “implicit association test” (IAT), a rapid-response task which measures how easily you can pair items from … Continue reading "This map shows what white Europeans associate with race – and it makes for uncomfortable reading"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: other people

Protecting babies and children against dangerous — sometimes fatal — diseases is a core mission of public health. Everyday, in health departments across the nation, someone is working on maintaining and improving childhood vaccination rates and keeping diseases like measles and mumps from regaining a foothold in the U.S.

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: conference chatter, drugs, geekalicious, the loony bin called academia, web 2.0, new media, and gadgets, what did they say about "balance," again?, open science, parents, regulamentacao, science festival, subdisciplines

Here are the highlights from the final day of the meeting: Carbon monoxide (CO) is not all that bad: Michael Tift, graduate student at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, described how the body naturally produces CO when red blood cells are broken down and CO can actually be protective against inflammation at low doses. His research was…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, 42, douglas adams, estrelas, italy, ke$hia, mouse ova

The August Krogh Distinguished lecture was awarded to Dr. Warren Burggren, who gave a fantastic lecture on epigenetics, or modifications to gene expression. He discussed how epigenetic changes to our genes are reversible. So when a stimulus like hypoxia changes our genes, these epigenetic changes to the genes go away rather quickly when the hypoxic insult…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, beauty, blog behavior

Vela has an amazing essay by a mother of a child with a rare chromosomal deletion. Put aside all your expectations about what this article will be like: it is about the hopes and reality of having a child, but it’s also about so much more. It’s an insightful commentary on the social expectations foisted … Continue reading "An alternative beauty in parenthood"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: uncategorized

Dopamine is an important hormone released from neurons involved in reward pathways. Researchers at Cornell University wanted to know if dopamine signaling was involved in how birds learn songs. Their findings, recently published in Science, present evidence that neurons in the brain of zebra finches do in fact decrease dopamine signals when the birds hear an…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, medicina baseada em evidãªncias, science popularization, tel aviv

A new article published in Physiological Reviews compared some remarkable similarities and differences between naked mole rats and humans. Both are relatively long-lived, highly social and have low natural selection pressures. But, this is about all they have in common. While humans are prone to developing age-related cancer, diabetes, heart disease and dementias, naked mole rats…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, adipocytes, epidemic intelligence service, science in college

Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind is a new book on cultural evolution in humans from a biological perspective. This is an interesting book and a good book, and I recommend it, but I need to add a strong caveat. The author could have made a more compelling argument had he more…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: in other news, baldwin effect, brain evolution, evolution of culture

via GIPHY A new article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presents the discovery of a species of frog with fluorescence. The South American polka dot tree frog, aka Hypsiboas punctatus is already rather cute under normal light. But when exposed to UV light, this frog really shines. It gets its glowing personality from…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, tents in unusual places


How do we learn to write? A Japanese study looked at the development of writing skills in Japanese first-grade students, and revealed aspects of handwriting development that have been largely neglected in research carried out in Latin alphabet communities.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

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The first rule of advocating for climate change-related legislation is: You do not talk about 'climate change.' The term has become so polarizing that its mere mention can cause reasonable people to draw seemingly immutable lines in the political sand.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

Professionally active doctors increasingly hesitate to take on the task of tutoring students from undergraduate medical education. Stress and pressure from higher up, and sometimes also from colleagues, contributes to this ambivalence.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

"Sport is too much like hard work." For many, that is reason enough to pass when it comes to exercise. But does sport really have to make you break into a sweat? Psychologists have discovered that one's own expectations have a major influence on just how strenuous one perceives a unit of sport to be.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

You may have experienced sleepless nights when you were anxious, stressed or too excited. Such emotions are well-known to affect wakefulness and can even cause insomnia, though the underlying mechanisms in our brain have still been unclear. Scientists have spotted neurons that play crucial roles in connecting emotions and sleep, shedding light on the future discovery of drug targets for anxiety disorder and/or sleep disorders.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are different. But at the biochemical level, these two neurodegenerative diseases start to look similar. This is how Emory scientists landed on a potential drug target for Parkinson's.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

While publishers look to produce ever more colourful and exciting texts to entice buyers, University of Sussex psychologists have shown that having more than one illustration per page results in poorer word learning among pre-schoolers.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily



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