Cognitive Science RSS Feed

Cognitive Science

Cognitive science information and blogs.
Feed created by jamesnies
121

This thread started by Ekaterina Damer has prompted many recommendations from psychologists on twitter. Can anyone recommend an (ideally brief) introductory paper or post or book explaining what makes for a good theory? For example, how to construct a good psychological theory, what are key things to consider?@psforscher @lakens @talyarkoni @chrisdc77 @tomstafford @kurtjgray — Ekaterina … Continue reading "After the methods crisis, the theory crisis"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

Open science essentials in 2 minutes, part 4 Before a research article is published in a journal you can make it freely available for anyone to read. You could do this on your own website, but you can also do it on a preprint server, such as psyarxiv.com, where other researchers also share their preprints, … Continue reading "Open Science Essentials: Preprints"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: theory

Authors: Holmes KJ, Flusberg SJ, Thibodeau PH Abstract Parts of the body are often embedded in the structure of compound words, such as heartbreak and brainchild. We explored the relationships between the semantics of compounds and their constituent body parts, asking whether these relationships are largely arbitrary or instead reflect deeper metaphorical mappings shared across languages and cultures. In three studies, we found that U.S. English speakers associated the English...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Castaño E, Gilboy E, Feijóo S, Serrat E, Rostan C, Hilferty J, Cunillera T Abstract Conceptual metaphor is ubiquitous in language and thought, as we usually reason and talk about abstract concepts in terms of more concrete ones via metaphorical mappings that are hypothesized to arise from our embodied experience. One pervasive example is the conceptual projection of valence onto space, which flexibly recruits the vertical and lateral spatial frames to gain structure (e.g.,...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

This study investigated the processes involved in the practice of new skills by expert breakdancers. A great deal of evidence supports the theory of "deliberate practice" (Ericsson, Krampe, & Tesch-Römer, 1993, Psychological Review, 100, 363) in skill acquisition; however, expert creative performers may emphasize other forms of practice for skill development. Four case studies collected through fieldwork and laboratory observation were analyzed to evaluate expert dancers' practice processes as...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Hofmann MJ, Biemann C, Westbury C, Murusidze M, Conrad M, Jacobs AM Abstract What determines human ratings of association? We planned this paper as a test for association strength (AS) that is derived from the log likelihood that two words co-occur significantly more often together in sentences than is expected from their single word frequencies. We also investigated the moderately correlated interactions of word frequency, emotional valence, arousal, and imageability of both...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Scientists present dueling theories in the high-stakes quest to understand how we hold and juggle multiple pieces of information in mind.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences


Authors: Beekhuizen B, Stevenson S Abstract We explore the following two cognitive questions regarding crosslinguistic variation in lexical semantic systems: Why are some linguistic categories-that is, the associations between a term and a portion of the semantic space-harder to learn than others? How does learning a language-specific set of lexical categories affect processing in that semantic domain? Using a computational word-learner, and the domain of color as a testbed, we...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

We present the results of an empirical study showing that the conceptual spaces framework can nevertheless be extended successfully to dimensional adjectives by complementing them with a comparison class argument (such as short/tall for an adult man and cheap/expensive for a smartphone), allowing participants to retrieve meaningful prototypical instances, which can be used to establish membership degree. Since dimensional adjectives are subjective, we investigate how the framework can...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

We present four simulation studies and one experiment demonstrating that when the population of learners is heterogeneous, the behavior of an iterated learning chain can be unpredictable and is often systematically distorted by the learners with the most extreme biases. This results in group-level outcomes that reflect neither the behavior of any individuals within the population nor the overall population average. We discuss implications for the use of iterated learning as a methodological...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Gottlieb S, Keltner D, Lombrozo T Abstract Awe has traditionally been considered a religious or spiritual emotion, yet scientists often report that awe motivates them to answer questions about the natural world, and to do so in naturalistic terms. Indeed, awe may be closely related to scientific discovery and theoretical advance. Awe is typically triggered by something vast (either literally or metaphorically) and initiates processes of accommodation, in which existing mental...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Authors: Fay N, Walker B, Swoboda N, Umata I, Fukaya T, Katagiri Y, Garrod S Abstract The present study points to several potentially universal principles of human communication. Pairs of participants, sampled from culturally and linguistically distinct societies (Western and Japanese, N = 108: 16 Western-Western, 15 Japanese-Japanese and 23 Western-Japanese dyads), played a dyadic communication game in which they tried to communicate a range of experimenter-specified items to a...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com

Multiple Factors and Multiple Mechanisms Determine the Quality of Conscious Experiences: A Reply to Anzulewicz and Wierzchoń. Cogn Sci. 2018 Jul 26;: Authors: Fazekas P, Overgaard M Abstract In this Letter to the Editor, we seize the opportunity to respond to the recent comments by Anzulewicz and Wierzchoń, and further clarify and extend the scope of our original paper. We re-emphasize that conscious experiences come in degrees, and that there are several factors that...

Source Feed: Cognitive Science via MedWorm.com


Advertisement




Given a video of a musical performance, CSAIL’s deep-learning system can make individual instruments louder or softer.

Source Feed: MIT News - Brain and cognitive sciences



I have a guest post for the Research Digest, snappily titled ‘People who think their opinions are superior to others are most prone to overestimating their relevant knowledge and ignoring chances to learn more‘. The paper I review is about the so-called “belief superiority” effect, which is defined by thinking that your views are better … Continue reading "Believing everyone else is wrong is a danger sign"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

I have a review of John Bargh’s new book “Before You Know It: The Unconscious Reasons We Do What We Do” in this month’s Psychologist magazine. You can read the review in print (or online here) but the magazine could only fit in 250 words, and I originally wrote closer to 700. I’ll put the … Continue reading "Review: John Bargh’s “Before You Know It”"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: books

Psychologists have been measuring reaction times since before psychology existed, and they are still a staple of cognitive psychology experiments today. Typically psychologists look for a difference in the time it takes participants to respond to stimuli under different conditions as evidence of differences in how cognitive processing occurs in those conditions. Galton, the famous … Continue reading "Did the Victorians have faster reactions?"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: nonsense

Spaced repetition is a memory hack. We know that spacing out your study is more effective than cramming, but using an app you can tailor your own spaced repetition schedule, allowing you to efficiently create reliable memories for any material you like. Michael Nielsen, has a nice thread on his use of spaced repetition on … Continue reading "spaced repetition & Darwin’s golden rule"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: learning

The contrast sensitivity function shows how our sensitivity to contrasts is affected by spatial frequency. You can test it using gratings of alternating light and darker shade. Ian Goodfellow has this neat observation: By looking at this image, you can see how sensitive your own eyes are to contrast at different frequencies (taller apparent peaks=more … Continue reading "A graph that is made by perceiving it"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: seeing

Nicky Case (of Explorable Explanations and Parable of the Polygons internet fame) has a fantastic essay which picks up on the theme of my last Cyberselves post – technology as companion, not competitor. In How To Become A Centaur Case gives blitz history of AI, and of its lesser known cousin IA – Intelligence Augmentation. … Continue reading "How To Become A Centaur"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

A talk I gave titled “Debating Sex Differences in Cognition: We Can Do Better” now has a home on the web. The pages align a rough transcript of the talk with the slides, for your browsing pleasure. Mindhacks.com readers will recognise many of the slides, which started their lives as blog posts. The full series … Continue reading "Debating Sex Differences: Talk transcript"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: gender

The backfire effect is when correcting misinformation hardens, rather than corrects, someone’s mistaken belief. It’s a relative of so called ‘attitude polarisation’ whereby people’s views on politically controversial topics can get more, not less, extreme when they are exposed to counter-arguments. The finding that misperception are hard to correct is not new – it fits … Continue reading "The backfire effect is elusive"

Source Feed: Mind Hacks
Categories: reasoning

You may be wondering why I have been so sentimental even though the year is not over yet. I am happy to inform you that it is not because I am retiring. On the contrary, I am packing up my virtual bags and moving this blog to a new site! Pardon the dust while we get…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, journalism, mark pendergrast

And the #1 blog entry published thus far in 2017 discussed whether there was an evolutionary advantage to being stupid: —- As I was looking through the scientific literature the other day, I came across an article published in 1973, “The Evolutionary Advantages of Being Stupid.” With a title like that, how could I not…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, counsyl, epidemics

Who could forget the second most popular blog post so far this year. Seeing an octopus walk never gets old! ——- I came across this amazing video on YouTube showing a species of octopus found in Northern Australia that is adapted to walk on land:

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, drugs, hela cells

A celebrity chef has joined Harvey Weinstein in news headlines about sexual harassment in the workplace. A work environment that tolerates sexual harassment makes workers ill. It's worker safety issue in need of much more attention.

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: journalism, sciwo says..., child abuse, physics, roger jones, scientific illiteracy, what the heck is this

The #3 post so far this year explored how zebra finches reward themselves for singing well: Dopamine is an important hormone released from neurons involved in reward pathways. Researchers at Cornell University wanted to know if dopamine signaling was involved in how birds learn songs. Their findings, recently published in Science, present evidence that neurons…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, evoluã§ã£o, food frontiers, tel aviv

In looking back over the history of the blog, I thought it would be fun to take another glimpse at the top 5 most popular posts in 2017 thus far… Image of lavender from GFDL 1.2, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=322384 While lavender aromatherapy has been documented to reduce stress in humans, little is known about its potential for…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, biotecnologia

A new study conducted by Drs. Sara Letzner and Onur Gunturkun (Ruhr-Universitat at Bochum) as well as Dr. Christian Beste (Technische Univeritat at Dresden) shows that pigeons are better than humans when it comes to multitasking. Their findings were published in Current Biology. The findings from the study show that the mammalian cerebral cortex, with all…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, clitoroplasty, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, counsyl

This is not my favorite book, because I think the subtitle should be “No, it doesn’t Steve” … but How the Mind Works is not without merit, and Steve Pinker is a great writer. Anyway, I thought you’s like to know that it is now available on Kindle for two bucks.

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, discharge tube, mitochondria, mussels

This is such a beautiful award-winning image of the complex vascular networks in a pigeon. The image was captured using  CT scan technology and a novel contrasting agent called BriteVu that allows visualization of even tiny capillaries. This image was captured by Scott Echols who is a member of the Grey Parrot Anatomy Project, whose…

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, clitoroplasty, creationism

Wow. This is a very interesting bit of history on how the CIA tried to use cats as spies. But as any cat owner knows, cats do not always do what you want them to do when you want them to do it. Source: YouTube

Source Feed: Brain & Behavior – ScienceBlogs
Categories: uncategorized, conferences, openhardware openscience openaccess


A new study has uncovered why some people that have brain markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) never develop the classic dementia that others do. The results showed that resilient individuals had a unique synaptic protein signature that set them apart from both demented AD patients and normal subjects with no AD pathology.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

In just three years, physician burnout increased from 45.5 percent to 54.4 percent, according to a new article. They offer three factors that they say contribute to this burnout.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

New work reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of inherited autism, fragile X syndrome, as well as to premature ovarian failure.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily


From 16 to 66 your personality will change and over time you will generally become more emotionally stable. But don't compare yourself to others; those who are the most emotionally stable when young are probably going to continue being the most stable as they age.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily



In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure -- before the patient feels any symptoms -- through neurostimulation of the sentinel area of the brain.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

In a pair of new modeling studies, researchers examined how policy reform in terms of drug decriminalization (in Mexico) and access to drug treatment (in Russia) might affect two regions hard hit by the HIV pandemic: Tijuana, Mexico and the Russian cities of Omsk and Ekaterinburg.

Source Feed: Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily

RSS Feed Subscribe to this Feed via RSS reader.

Related Feeds
Music News      Science News      MLB Baseball      Astronomy News      Movie News      IT Status Page      NBA      PakApNews     

Advertisement