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I talked about the different aspects of building a database engine in detail in the past month or so. But I tried to talk about each topic independently, so it will make sense. The problem is that in the real world, there are actually quite a lot of related stuff that impact on one another. This series of posts is meant to tie everything together, so you’ll have a better understanding how the design decisions in one place being affected by the requirement in somewhere that seems utterly...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Monday is a Public Holiday here in the UK England and Wales, and, as is traditional, I shall be taking a break from publication – returning on Tuesday 30th August. Have a good weekend everyone. Software Continuous Delivery of iOS Applications with Team Services – Madhuri Gummalla Information ASP.NET Core 1.0 with MySQL and Entity […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew



In this article, you will learn about ng-Src directive in AngularJS.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles







In this article, you will learn the tips of fine tuning the performance of SQL Server.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

I mentioned that maintaining physical ids is important for performance reasons in my previous post, but I skipped on exactly why. The short answer is that if I have a physical ids, it is much easier to implement locality and much easier to implement parallel locality. Let us imagine a database whose size is about 100GB, running on a machine that has 6 GB of RAM. You need to do run some sort of computation that traverse the graph, but doing so naively will likely cause us to trash quite a lot,...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Information What’s New in C# 7.0 – Mads Torgersen The Lightweight Visual Studio "15" Installer – Adam Welch Proposed Roadmap for Marten 1.0 and Beyond – Jeremy D Miller Database Building 101: Stable node ids – Ayende Attributes of a great development team member – David Starr Building NuGet (.NET Core) using Atlassian Bitbucket Pipelines […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

A few posts ago, I talked about the problem of having unstable ids, in particular, ids that can be reused. That leads to quite a lot of complexity, as anyone who ever had to deal with Lucene documents ids knows. So we are willing to pay something toward stable ids, the questions is what? One way of doing that is to just store the physical id (unstable) and a virtual id (stable) in a B+Tree (actually, a pair of them, since you’ll need to refer to them back and forth). That means that for the...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software CodeRush for Roslyn: The Fastest .Net Test Runner – Rory Becker Information The week in .NET – 8/23/2016 – Bertrand Le Roy Production postmortem: The insidious cost of managed memory – Ayende Analysing Optimisations in the Wire Serialiser – Matt Warren Creating a Serverless Backend for Mobile Apps – James Montemagno Adventures in F# […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

8/24/2016
Last week my family and I went on a cruise to Alaska with four other families and we didn’t die. Not that we should expect to die on a cruise, but being confined with a bunch of kids on a giant hunk of steel has a way of making one consider one’s mortality. Not only did we not die, but I learned a thing or two. For example, it’s common knowledge that the constant wave like motion of a ship can make one queasy. I learned that I could counteract that effect. Drink just the right amount of...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

A customer reported that under memory constrained system, a certain operation is taking all the memory and swapping hard. On a machine with just a bit more memory, the operation completed very quickly. It didn’t take long to figure out what was going on, we were reading too much, and we started swapping, and everything went to hell after that. The problem is that we have code that is there specifically to prevent that, it is there to check that the size that we load from the disk isn’t too...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Visual Studio "15" Preview 4 – John Montgomery Testing private/intranet applications using Cloud-based load testing – Deepak Singhal Work items now open in the web from Visual Studio ’15’ – Dante Santos GitHub Extension for Visual Studio 2.0 is now available – Andreia Gaita Information Waiting for .NET Core Tooling – Rockford Lhotka Git […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

I talked about high level and low level data operations. So far, all we have seen are very low level operations (get node, get edges for, etc). Let us see how we’ll deal with a bigger challenge. In this case, we want to implement a classic graph operation, doing a depth first search, filtering by both nodes and edges. Here is how we can implement this: In the real world, we’ll need quite a bit more. On each node (and edge) we’ll need to decide if to return it from the query, or just traverse...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

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Software Windows PowerShell is now "PowerShell": An Open Source Project with Linux support – How did we do it? – Angel Calvo Why are we open sourcing our extensions? – Willy-P. Schaub Information ASP.NET Core logging with NLog and Elasticsearch – Damien Bowden Fixing JSON – Tim Bray Database Building 101: Graphs aren’t toys – […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

I  keep calling this a toy database, and it is true for more reasons than the code existing mostly as unconnected snippets. When defining the storage layer, I breezed through quite a lot of stuff because they didn’t really matter for the point I was trying to make. We’ll start with talking about node IDs. When we save a node to the database, we get an int64 ID back. What is that? We know that it gives us an O(1) access time to the node (or the edge data), but that’s about it. Typically, we...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

So now that we know how to store the data, in a way that allows efficient graph traversal, let’s compute some back of the envelope computations for storage costs. Like any storage system, Voron needs to store some metadata about our data, and sometimes this can be very surprising to people. Let’s look at each of the items that we store in turn. Node data is stored in a table. Edge data is stored in a table. The edge itself is stored in a B+Tree containing fixed size trees. A table does a...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

So far we looked into how we can store the nodes and the edges, and we explored some interesting data structures inside Voron. Now, let’s see how we can traverse the graph. So getting the node is pretty easy, and remember that to access the table by ID gives us an O(1) cost. Now, what about finding all the edges from a node? This is a lot heftier, but let’s try to break it into individual pieces. First, we find the tree holding all the edges of that particular type, then we access (by the ID...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

We are going to be using Voron to actually handle the storage of the data. Voron is a low level storage engine, which provide, among other things, fully ACID, MVCC and high performance. For today, what'll look at are the following operations: Add a node. Add an edge between two nodes. Traverse from a node to all its edges (cheaply) Traverse from an edge to the other node (cheaply). Here is the interface code that we will need to build: I tried to make it as simple as it possible could be....

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

The touted benefits of design patterns are that they allow proliferation of best practices and allow for efficient communication between engineers, but how does that play out in practice?

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content

In the Guts n’ Glory of Database Internals posts series (which I’ll probably continue if people suggest new topics), I talked about the very low level things that are involved in actually building a database. From how to ensure consistency to the network protocols. But those are very low level concerns. Important ones, but very low level. In this series, I want to start going up a bit in the stack and actually implement a toy database on top of real production system, to show you what the...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien



See how paying attention to your function signature, utilizing language features where possible and using immutable data structures and pure functions can get you pretty far.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content





With Xamarin, you develop in C# and have the power of the .NET framework behind you. Xamarin does the heavy lifting of translating your C# code to the native mobile OS.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content


I’ll be in the UK next week presenting at the free AzureCraft event being held on June 3rd and 4th.  This event was created by the UK Azure User Group and is a great way to learn about Azure as well as engage with the Azure community in the UK. What’s new in Azure Talk I’ll be speaking on June 3rd from 9:30-11:30am on “What’s new in Azure”.  It is going to have a lot of new content and highlight some of the cool new services and capabilities in Azure that developers might not have had a chance...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, .net, community news, data

The tagline for the Atom text editor is “A hackable text editor for the 21st Century”. As a Haack, this is a goal I can get behind. It accomplishes this hackability by building on Electron, a platform for building cross-platform desktop applications with web technology (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript). The ability to leverage these skills in order to extend your text editor is really powerful. I thought I’d put this to the test by building a simple extension for Atom. I decided to port the...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Yesterday, the NuGet team announced that NuGet.org reached one billion package downloads! It’s exciting to see NuGet still going strong. As part of the original team that created NuGet, we always had high hopes for its future but were also cognizant of all the things that could go wrong. So seeing hope turn into reality is a great feeling. At the same time, there is still so much more to do. One billion is just a number, albeit a significant and praiseworthy one. I love that the post calls...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

As an open source maintainer, it’s important to recognize and show appreciation for contributions, especially external contributions. We’ve known for a while that after a person’s basic needs are met, money is a poor motivator and does not lead to better work. This seems especially true for open source projects. Often, people are motivated by other intrinsic factors such as the recognition and admiration of their peers, the satisfaction of building something that lasts, or because they need...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Some people, when confronted with a problem, think “I know, I’ll use regular expressions.” Now they have two problems. - Jamie Zawinski For other people, when confronted with writing a blog post about regular expressions, think “I know, I’ll quote that Jamie Zawinski quote!” It’s the go to quote about regular expressions, but it’s probably no surprise that it’s often taken out of context. Back in 2006, Jeffrey Friedl tracked down the original context of this statement in a fine piece of...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

As the role of mobile devices in people's lives expands even further, mobile app developers have become a driving force for software innovation. At Microsoft, we are working to enable even greater developer innovation by providing the best experiences to all developers, on any device, with powerful tools, an open platform and a global cloud. As part of this commitment I am pleased to announce today that Microsoft has signed an agreement to acquire Xamarin, a leading platform provider for...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: mobile, azure, .net, visual studio

Vacation, All I ever wanted Vacation, Had to get away Vacation, Meant to be spent alone Lyrics by The Go Go’s When I joined GitHub four years ago, I adored its unlimited paid time off benefit. It’s not that I planned to take a six month trek across Nepal (or the more plausible scenario of playing X-Box in my pajamas for six months), but I liked the message it sent. It told me this company valued its employees, wanted them to not burn out, and trusted them to behave like stakeholders in...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Over on the GitHub Engineering blog my co-worker Jesse Toth published a fascinating post about the Ruby library named Scientist we use at GitHub to help us run experiments comparing new code against the existing production code. It’s an enjoyable read with a really great analogy comparing this approach to building a new bridge. The analogy feels very relevant to those of us here in the Seattle area as we’re in the midst of a major bridge construction project across Lake Washington as they...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

A long time request of http://semver.org/ (just shy of five years!) is to be able to link to specific headings and clauses of the Semver specification. For example, want to win that argument about PATCH version increments? Link to that section directly. Today I pushed a change to semver.org that implements this. Go try it out by hovering over any section heading or list item in the main specification section! Sorry for the long delay. I hope to get the next feature request more promptly, like...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

I have a big problem as a dad. For the most part, my kids are wonderful. Like most kids, they have their infuriating moments. But that’s not the problem of which I speak. It may help for me to describe one such scenario. My family and I are in Portland for a brief trip. As I drove around an unfamiliar location, my daughter asked the typical question kids ask as a form of advanced psychological torture, “Are we there yet?” This wasn’t so bad. My wife calmly explained to my daughter not to...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

12/31/2015
I planned to skip the tried and true year in review post because who reads such drivel anyways, amirite? They feel like one big exercise in vanity. But it dawned on me. Perhaps, I lost touch with what blogging was all about. What it’s always been all about. Hasn’t it always been one big unabashed and unashamed exercise in vanity? Though writers better than me tend to couch it as something that sounds more virtuous with words like “write for yourself” and such while they smirk awash in the...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Yesterday we held our AzureCon event and were fortunate to have tens of thousands of developers around the world participate.  During the event we announced several great new enhancements to Microsoft Azure including: General Availability of 3 new Azure regions in India Announcing new N-series of Virtual Machines with GPU capabilities Announcing Azure IoT Suite available to purchase Announcing Azure Container Service Announcing Azure Security Center We were also fortunate to be joined on...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news

Today, I’m happy to announce several key additions to our big data services in Azure, including the General Availability of HDInsight on Linux, as well as the introduction of our new Azure Data Lake and Language services. General Availability of HDInsight on Linux Today we are announcing general availability of our HDInsight service on Ubuntu Linux.  HDInsight enables you to easily run managed Hadoop clusters in the cloud.  With today’s release we now allow you to configure these clusters to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, sql server, hadoop

This Tuesday, Sept 29th, we are hosting our online AzureCon event – which is a free online event with 60 technical sessions on Azure presented by both the Azure engineering team as well as MVPs and customers who use Azure today and will share their best practices. I’ll be kicking off the event with a keynote at 9am PDT.  Watch it to learn the latest on Azure, and hear about a lot of exciting new announcements.  We’ll then have some fantastic sessions that you can watch throughout the day to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, .net

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