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.NET Development News

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Krzysztof has been working on our RavenDB Go Client for almost a year, and we are at the final stretch (docs, tests, deployment, etc). He has written a blog post detailing the experience of porting over 50,000 lines of code from Java to Go.I wanted to point out a few additional things about the porting effort and the Go client API that he didn’t get to.From the perspective of RavenDB, we want to have as many clients as possible, because the more clients we have, the more approachable we are...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Today we will go through some useful git commands you should know as a developer.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

In this article, I will be explaining the usage of Swagger in our Web Projects and then, we will see how to implement it.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles


This article explains how to send email in Orchard CMS using MessageService.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

This article is about integration and basic usage of the Bootstrap Time Picker jQuery plugin in ASP.NET MVC5 platform.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

Friday and Monday are Public Holidays here in the England, so in keeping with Morning Brew tradition there will be no edition on Friday or Monday, with normal posting resuming on Tuesday. Enjoy the long weekend everyone. Information Load Testing on the Web with K6 – K. Scott Allen Modifying the .NET CLR ThreadPool Settings […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

In this article, we will understand the Builder Design Pattern, when we should actually use it, and a practical example along with the disadvantages and advantages of it.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

Azure Functions lets you execute your code in a serverless environment without having to first create a VM or publish a web application. You learn how create azure function by use Visual Studio 2017 tools. You then publish the function code to Azure. Then you call this function by using ASP.NET Core Web application.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles




I’m going to be in London at the beginning of June. I’ll be giving a keynote at Skills Matters as well as visiting some customers.I have a half day and a full day slots available for consulting (RavenDB, databases and overall architecture). Drop me a line if you are interested.I also should have an evening or two free is there is anyone who wants to sit over a beer and chat.

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Edit & Continue, Just-in-time Debugging, and more debugger improvements in Rider 2019.1 – Matthias Koch Information Using strongly-typed entity IDs to avoid primitive obsession (Part 3) – Andrew Lock Explicit Interface Implementation with C# – Christian Nagel C# Operators: A Detailed Guide to All Of Them – Phil Vuollet Configuring AWS SDK in ASP.NET […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

Looks like a publishing glitch prevented today’s edition going out when it should have….better late than never! Information .NET Core Workers in Azure Container Instances – Brady Gaster 8 Ways You can Cause Memory Leaks in .NET – Michael Shpilt How to Write a Custom Logging Provider in ASP.NET Core – Theo Bebekis Getting Started […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

In a previous post about authorization in a microservice environment, I wrote that one option is to generate an authorization token and have it hold the relevant claims for the application. I was asked how I would handle a scenario in which the security claim is over individual categories of orders and a user may have too many categories to fit the token.This is a great question, because it showcase a really important part of such a design. An inherent limit to complexity.  The fact that...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

I talked a bit about microservices architecture in the past few weeks, but I think that there is a common theme to those posts that is missed in the details.A microservices architecture, just like Domain Driven Design or Event Source and CQRS are architectural patterns that are meant to manage complexity. In the realms of operations, Kubernetes is another good example of a tool that is meant to manage complexity.I feel that this is a part that is all too often getting lost. The law of leaky...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Information Changes to Coded UI Test in Visual Studio 2019 – Prachi Bora Constraining Generics in C# – Peter Mbanugo File uploads in ASP.NET Core integration tests – Gunnar Peipman ASP​.NET Core 3.0 has had a+30% performance improvement in in the last 2 months alone! – Ben Adams 5 Top, No-Cost .NET Core Extensions for […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

They just aren’t. And I’m talking as someone who has actually implemented multiple distributed transaction systems. People moving to microservices are now discovering a lot of the challenges and hurdles of distributed systems and it is only natural to want to go back to the cozy transactional world, where you can reason about things properly. This post is in response to this article: Microservices and distributed transactions, which I read with interest, because it isn’t often that a post will...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software New features for extension authors in Visual Studio 2019 version 16.1 – Mads Kristensen Breadcrumbs, structural navigation, parameter info tooltips and more editor improvements in Rider 2019.1 – Matthias Koch Information Using strongly-typed entity IDs to avoid primitive obsession (Part 2) – Andrew Lock The Git Stash Functionality in Visual Studio 2019 – Thomas […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

This post was triggered by this post. Mostly because I got people looking strangely at me when I shouted DO NOT DO THAT when I read the post.We’ll use the usual Users and Orders example, because that is simple to work with. We have the usual concerns about users in our application:AuthenticationPassword resetTwo factor authUnusual activity detectionEtc, etc, etc.AuthorizationCan the user perform this particular operation?Can the user perform this action on this item?Can the user perform this...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

This post is in reply to this one: Is a Shared Database in Microservices Actually an Anti-pattern?The author does a great job outlining the actual problem. Given two services that need to share some data, how do you actually manage that in a microservice architecture? The author uses the Users and Orders example, which is great, because it is pretty simple and require very little domain knowledge. The first question to ask is: Why? Why use microservices? Wikipedia says:The benefit of...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

RavenDB 4.x is using X509 Certificates for authentication. We got a feedback question from a customer about that, they much rather to use API Keys, instead.We actually considered this as part of the design process for 4.x and we concluded that we can make this work in just the same manner as API Keys. Here is how you can make it work.You have the certificate file (usually PFX) and convert that to a Base64 string, like so:[System.Convert]::ToBase64String( (gc "cert.pfx" -Encoding byte ) )You...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

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Last week we had a couple of interesting milestones. The first of which is that we reached the End Of Life for RavenDB 3.0. If you are still running on RavenDB 3.0 (or any previous version), be aware that this marks the end of the support cycle for that version. You are strongly encouraged to upgrade to RavenDB 3.5 (which still has about 1.5 years of support).I got an email today from a customer talking about maybe considering upgrade from the RavenDB version that was released in Dec 2012, so...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

I just realized that this is my first blog post, it was published in April 1st, 2004. I don’t really know what else to say, to be honest. I have been doing this blog for 15(!) years.

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien


Strap in for a rollicking exploration of the NuGet package signing feature. What is the feature and what is it good for? And does it live up to its purpose? Yes, my friends, I know how to party. To get reacquainted with my old pal NuGet, I updated some old packages and tweeted about the fun I had doing it. That’s when my buddy Oren rained on my parade. Perhaps my answer was a bit glib. Just a bit. But if you peer behind the glib “nope”, there’s an overflowing cauldron of thoughts. These...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: nuget, security, oss




Language: .NET, Expertise: Beginner - See how to use the System.Environment namespace's GetFolderPath method to retrieve the path of a special folder.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content




2/19/2019
Every project risks failure to some degree or other. There’s the risk of delivering late. The risk of not being able to deliver at all. Or the risk that you do deliver in the end, but it solves the wrong problem. It’s a risky business, but not the kind with Tom Cruise lip-synching in his underwear. When you work on a project, it’s important to be aware of and manage risk. There are several good tools for doing this. Postmortem (Retrospectives) OA well-known procedure is the postmortem (or...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: work, consulting, management


I’m a big fan of Git aliases as a means of improving your developer workflow when using Git. They are great for automating common tasks. They also can help make sense of the byzantine set of options Git has. So far, I’ve written a few blog posts with helpful aliases. GitHub Flow Like a Pro with these 13 Git Aliases Git Alias To Migrate Commits To A Branch Git Alias to browse Git alias to create a pull request in the browser It’s wonderful to see all these aliases out there, but...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: git, aliases

Language: .NET, Expertise: Advanced - See low Visual Studio allows you to leave warning notes for fellow developers.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content

For several years now, I’ve been the maintainer of the SemVer specification. It’s been an honor and privilege to be in this position. But I’ll be honest, it’s also an enormous responsibility and a big pain in the ass. This is why I’m happy to say that I am stepping down as the maintainer of SemVer and passing the torch to a team of maintainers better suited to direct its future. Now the pain (and honor, don’t forget the honor) can be distributed among multiple people, and not focused on just...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: semver

GitHub had about 50 employees when I joined back in December 2011. Seven years later, it blew past 950 people and Microsoft acquired it for $7.5 Billion. What would you say if I told you it could have been way more valuable than that? You might say I’ve taken up paint sniffing as a hobby. After all, this is a tremendous exit. And the truth is, I’m ecstatic about it. I’m not complaining by any means. GitHub built a valuable business and was worth every penny of Microsoft’s money. Everyone at...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: work, consulting

What if I told you there’s a way you can increase your giving by up to 50% or more (depending on your tax bracket) at no cost to you? For every dollar you put in, you’d have $1.50 to give to a charity of your choice? Interested? Read on then. Why Give? First, why give in the first place? If you’re a software developer, chances are, you are well paid. For example, compensation at Lyft start at $236,000. If you make that much, you’re in the top 2% within the United States. If you read my...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: personal, charity

It used to be a tradition at GitHub to announce new hires with a blog post with the pattern, “So and so is a GitHubber.” Each post would be accompanied by an image. On December 7, 2011, I got my very own with a photo of me with giant robot arms. The arms are a bald attempt to cozy up to the one who really ran the show at GitHub, Hubot. Over time, the images became animated gifs. And these became more and more elaborate. As you can imagine, this practice did not scale as GitHub grew. You’d...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: personal, work

A name like Haack does not make me destined to win awards as an outstanding designer. I’ve come to grips with that. I’m not terrible, mind you. I’d say my skill level is somewhere in the ballpark of slightly above Geocities and closely approaching the aesthetics of Craigslist, on a good day. If you too lack the knack (like Haack) for design, then you know it’s painful to craft a decent look and feel for your website. It’s arduous. The quirks of CSS will drive you to pull out your hair in...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: jekyll, design, meta

Sit back and relax as I regale you with a harrowing account of trying to do something straightforward with CSS. Ha! Straightforward. How silly was I to think that. As they say, Fool me once. Shame on you. Fool me twice, CSS. To give credit where credit is due, my blog has a contributors page. This page lists the folks who have submitted a pull request to my blog with corrections such as typo and spelling fixes. Lots and lots of fixes. Because I make a lot of mistakes. The first version...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: css, design

UPDATE April 3, 2019 Several years after I wrote this post, NuGet added a package signing feature. I wrote a blog post that takes a close look at the feature. Package managers are among the most valuable tools in a developer’s toolkit. A package can inject hundreds to thousands of lines of useful code into a project that a developer would otherwise have to write by hand. Ain’t nobody got time for that! Of course, such tools do not come without risk as highlighted by the event-stream...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: nuget, security

I’ll be in the UK next week presenting at the free AzureCraft event being held on June 3rd and 4th.  This event was created by the UK Azure User Group and is a great way to learn about Azure as well as engage with the Azure community in the UK. What’s new in Azure Talk I’ll be speaking on June 3rd from 9:30-11:30am on “What’s new in Azure”.  It is going to have a lot of new content and highlight some of the cool new services and capabilities in Azure that developers might not have had a chance...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, .net, community news, data

As the role of mobile devices in people's lives expands even further, mobile app developers have become a driving force for software innovation. At Microsoft, we are working to enable even greater developer innovation by providing the best experiences to all developers, on any device, with powerful tools, an open platform and a global cloud. As part of this commitment I am pleased to announce today that Microsoft has signed an agreement to acquire Xamarin, a leading platform provider for...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: mobile, azure, .net, visual studio

Yesterday we held our AzureCon event and were fortunate to have tens of thousands of developers around the world participate.  During the event we announced several great new enhancements to Microsoft Azure including: General Availability of 3 new Azure regions in India Announcing new N-series of Virtual Machines with GPU capabilities Announcing Azure IoT Suite available to purchase Announcing Azure Container Service Announcing Azure Security Center We were also fortunate to be joined on...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news

Today, I’m happy to announce several key additions to our big data services in Azure, including the General Availability of HDInsight on Linux, as well as the introduction of our new Azure Data Lake and Language services. General Availability of HDInsight on Linux Today we are announcing general availability of our HDInsight service on Ubuntu Linux.  HDInsight enables you to easily run managed Hadoop clusters in the cloud.  With today’s release we now allow you to configure these clusters to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, sql server, hadoop

This Tuesday, Sept 29th, we are hosting our online AzureCon event – which is a free online event with 60 technical sessions on Azure presented by both the Azure engineering team as well as MVPs and customers who use Azure today and will share their best practices. I’ll be kicking off the event with a keynote at 9am PDT.  Watch it to learn the latest on Azure, and hear about a lot of exciting new announcements.  We’ll then have some fantastic sessions that you can watch throughout the day to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, .net

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