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.NET Development News

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Information GC Perf Infrastructure – Part 1 – Maoni Stephens We made Windows Server Core container images >40% smaller – Richard Lander Fun with URL Encodings – Phil Haack Unit Testing Overview with ASP.NET Core, XUnit, and Moq – Matthew Jones Should We Be Thinking of APIs in a more Polyglot Way? – Shawn Wildermuth […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

Software Update 19.11 for Azure Sphere SDK now available – Ed Nightingale Information Remote Debugging a .NET Core Linux app in WSL2 from Visual Studio on Windows – Scott Hanselman Runtime Host Configuration Options and AppContext data in .NET Core – Filip W C# 9 – Bassam Alugili November 2019 .NET/ASP.NET Documentation Update – Maxime […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

Yesterday
In this article you get a SASS Tutorial.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles





In this article you will learn how to manage intelligent SQL in the cloud.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles



Quick! How many ways are there with .NET Core to encode parts of a URL? Here’s a list I came up with. HttpUtility.UrlEncode - This is part of System.Web, so primarily used within a web application. WebUtility.UrlEncode - Part of System.Net so it can be used outside of a web application. Uri.EscapeUriString - 99 out of 100 developers agree you should pretty much never use this method. Use EscapeDataString instead. Uri.EscapeDataString - This method is the jam for encoding a full URL...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: aspnet, web



After a long journey, I have an actual data structure implemented. I only lightly tested it, and didn’t really do too much with it. In fact, as it current stands, I didn’t even implement a way to delete the table. I relied on closing the process to release the memory. It sounds like a silly omission, right? Something that is easily fixed. But I run into a tricky problem with implementing this. Let’s write the simplest free method we can:Simple enough, no? But let’s look at one setup of the...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

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Software .NET Core 2.2 will reach End of Life on December 23, 2019 – Lee Coward Updates to .NET Core Windows Forms designer in Visual Studio 16.5 Preview 1 – Olia Gavrysh Information Using WebAssembly from .NET with Wasmtime – Peter Huene Pinnable Properties: Debug & Display Managed Objects YOUR Way – Leslie Richardson Message […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

The naïve overflow handling I wrote previously kept me up at night. I really don’t like it. I finally figured out what I could do to handle this in an elegant fashion.The idea is to:Find the furthest non overflow piece from the current one.Read its keys and try to assign them to its natural location.If successfully moved all non native keys, mark the previous piece as non overlapping.Go back to the previous piece and do it all over again.Maybe it will be better to look at it in code?There is...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Information Use Blazor in your existing ASP.NET Core 3.x application – Jon Hilton Localization in Blazor UI – Marin Bratanov What’s new in XAML developer tools in Visual Studio 2019 for WPF & UWP – Dmitry Lyalin What’s new with SQL Server 2019 Linux features – Kellyn Gorman Working with Linux and Windows Containers simultaneously […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

In the world of design (be it software or otherwise), being able to make assumptions is a good thing. If I can’t assume something, I have to handle it. For example, if I can assume a competent administrator, I don’t need to write code to handle a disk full error. A competent admin will never let that scenario to happen, right?In some cases, such assumptions are critical to being able to design a system at all. In physics, you’ll often run into questions involving spherical objects in vacuum,...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Announcing .NET Core 3.1 – Richard Lander ASP.NET Core updates in .NET Core 3.1 – Sourabh Shirhatti Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.1 and Entity Framework 6.4 – Arthur Vickers ‘Tis the Season for the Visual Studio 2019 v16.4 Release – Jacqueline Widdis Information Converting integration tests to .NET Core 3.0: Upgrading to ASP.NET Core […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

I run perf tests and memory utilization tests on my implementation and finally got it to the right place. But the API I have is pretty poor. I can put a key and value, or get the value by key. But we probably want a few more features.I changed the put implementation to be:This allows me to do an atomic replace and get the old value from the table. That is a nice low hanging fruit. But the key feature that I want to talk about today is iteration, as you might have figured out from the post...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

I did a video cast when Chen a few weeks ago. I think it went quite well.Oren shares his story on how he taught himself how to code in "Prison" and became an open-source developer, coding a prison management system and how he founded Hibernating Rhinos. If you are an open-source developer or entrepreneur, you'll find in this videocast some great ideas by Oren - about how to plan ahead and fail properly, promoting an open-source project, and giving advice to people who are beginning their...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

In the previous post, I wrote about how I changed the structure of the hash leaf page to increase data density. I managed to get it down to 32MB range when I’m using random keys. That is a pretty great number, for memory usage, but what is the cost in terms of performance?Well, let’s figure it out, shall we? I added some tracing code and got the first result:3.124000 us/op with 32.007813 MBThat is not to shabby, right? Let’s see where we are spending most of our time, shall we? I opened the...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Sometimes you just need to submit a form and update a portion of your web page without a lot of fuss and muss. Today, you have a lot of options for dynamically updating the DOM based on changes made on the server. You could use React, Vue, Angular, SignalR, and Blazor. The choice you make will depend a lot on your experience and your scenario and how much complexity you can endure. For a site I’m building, I like to start as simple as possible and only add in components as the pain they solve...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: aspnet, js

I’m continuing to explore the use of extendible hashing and I run into an interesting scenario. The whole point of using a hash table is to reduce the cost of lookups to O(1). When using persistent data structures, the usual cost that we care about is not the number of CPU instructions, but the number of disk accesses.For B-Trees, the usual cost is O(log(N, fanout) ). A typical fanout rate for a B-Tree in Voron would be around 256. In other words, if we have a hundred million records in a...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

After my post yesterday, I dug a lot deeper into extendible hashing. There is a wealth of information on the topic. What is more interesting, from my point of view, is just how freaking elegant this data structure is.I spent a few hours implementing it, because I don’t really get a data structure until I actually sat down and writing it in code. I decided to write it in C, because I haven’t written C in a while. It took about 200 lines of code, and I could see how it works.Well, I saw see, but...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

There is a specific scenario that I run into that could be really helped by an O(1) lookup cost on a disk persistent data structure. Voron, our storage engine library, is built on top of a whole big pile of B+Trees, which has an O(logN) lookup cost. I could use that, but I wanted to see if we could do better. The natural thing to do when you hear about O(1) costs is to go fetch the nearest hash table, so I spent some time thinking about how to build a hash table that would be persisted to...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

I run into this blog post talking about how to handle optimistic concurrency in MongoDB and it brought to mind a very fundamental difference in the design philosophy between RavenDB and MongoDB. If you’ll read the associated blog post, you’ll see guidance on how to build a simple optimistic concurrency using the MongoDB API. It looks like a relatively straightforward thing, but there is a lot of complexity going on here.With RavenDB, we have decided that the responsibility of such tasks is on...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien


Language: .NET, Expertise: Intermediate - With the Skip and Take methods in LINQ, paging has become a lot easier. Learn how to use them to provide paging to your items.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content





Language: .NET, Expertise: Intermediate - Use this extension method in C# to check whether or not an input argument is null, and throw error if necessary.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content


Developer tools that understand code semantics have a lot of potential. They have potential to make developers more productive and reduce the friction and drudgery of our craft. But it can be difficult to put these tools to use in practice. Many of them require a steep learning curve to use. It would be nice if we could automate the benefits of some of these tools. You can see where I’m going with this. For example, a while back, I wrote a post on how semantic diff and merge tools can reduce...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: git, semantic

Language: .NET, Expertise: Intermediate - See how to reverse a string in C#.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content

Language: .NET, Expertise: Intermediate - See how to use the CultureInfo class in C# to format values based on a culture.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content

This post describes how to apply an Entity Framework Core Global Query filter on all entity types that implement an interface using a strongly typed expression. And why you might want to do that in the first place. One way to implement a multi-tenant application is to use a discriminator column (aka a tenant_id column on every table). This is a risky proposition. Every query must remember to filter by the tenant_id. One missed query and you expose data from one tenant to another. That’ll get...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: data, ef

In my last post, I showed how to flow claims from an external identity provider (also referred to as a login provider) to your application. My post walks through how to bring over the claims every time the user logs in. But why would I want to do this? On Twitter, Brock Allen replied to my post with this tweet, IMO, external claims (other than sub) are only useful to pre-populate the registration page in your app the first time the user ever shows up from the external IdP. Otherwise, and...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: aspnet, security

I love it when a website lets me use my Google, GitHub, or Facebook account to log in. Chances are, I’m already logged into those sites, so it’s one click to log into a new site. This is a great experience for users. It reduces the friction to registration and loggin in to your site. They’re less likely to clam up. It’s easy to add external authentication to ASP.NET Core applications. For example, if you want users to log in with their Google or Facebook credentials, follow these...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: aspnet, security

Azure has a neat feature that runs Azure Functions from a package file (aka a zip file). This same feature also applies to Azure Web Apps, though you wouldn’t know it from the documentation. The Run from Package docs only mention Azure Functions. The GitHub issue that announced the feature makes it clear this also applies to Web Apps. Run From Package is an exciting new feature which lets you run a Web App or Function App by simply pointing it to a zip file containing your files. There...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: aspnet, azure

When you merge two branches, there may be conflicting changes between the branches. Git can often resolve these differences without intervention. For example, when each branch has changes to different files or lines of code. But sometimes each branch has changes that Git cannot resolve without help. For example, if two developers change the same line of code. Or if one developer deletes a file, but the other changed the file. In these situations, Git fails the merge operation and reports a...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: git, semantic

Raise your hand if you enjoy merge conflicts. I’ll go out on a limb and guess that nobody has a hand up. If you do have your hand up - first, you look silly right now. I can’t see you. And second, you’re being contrarian. Nobody likes merge conflicts. They’re a hassle. I know the data backs me up here. When I started at GitHub, I worked on a Git client. If you can avoid it, never work on a Git client. It’s painful. The folks that build these things are true heroes in my book. Every one of...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: git, semantic

It happened again. A group of hackers targeted another cryptocurrency wallet via a malicious NPM package. The good news is that this attempt was foiled. Yesterday, the npm, Inc. security team, in collaboration with Komodo, helped protect over $13 million USD in cryptocurrency assets as we found and responded to a malware threat targeting the users of a cryptocurrency wallet called Agama. The bad news is this is just the attempt we know about. This attack is a variant of the...

Source Feed: You’ve Been Haacked
Categories: nuget, security, oss

I’ll be in the UK next week presenting at the free AzureCraft event being held on June 3rd and 4th.  This event was created by the UK Azure User Group and is a great way to learn about Azure as well as engage with the Azure community in the UK. What’s new in Azure Talk I’ll be speaking on June 3rd from 9:30-11:30am on “What’s new in Azure”.  It is going to have a lot of new content and highlight some of the cool new services and capabilities in Azure that developers might not have had a chance...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, .net, community news, data

As the role of mobile devices in people's lives expands even further, mobile app developers have become a driving force for software innovation. At Microsoft, we are working to enable even greater developer innovation by providing the best experiences to all developers, on any device, with powerful tools, an open platform and a global cloud. As part of this commitment I am pleased to announce today that Microsoft has signed an agreement to acquire Xamarin, a leading platform provider for...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: mobile, azure, .net, visual studio

Yesterday we held our AzureCon event and were fortunate to have tens of thousands of developers around the world participate.  During the event we announced several great new enhancements to Microsoft Azure including: General Availability of 3 new Azure regions in India Announcing new N-series of Virtual Machines with GPU capabilities Announcing Azure IoT Suite available to purchase Announcing Azure Container Service Announcing Azure Security Center We were also fortunate to be joined on...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news

Today, I’m happy to announce several key additions to our big data services in Azure, including the General Availability of HDInsight on Linux, as well as the introduction of our new Azure Data Lake and Language services. General Availability of HDInsight on Linux Today we are announcing general availability of our HDInsight service on Ubuntu Linux.  HDInsight enables you to easily run managed Hadoop clusters in the cloud.  With today’s release we now allow you to configure these clusters to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, sql server, hadoop

This Tuesday, Sept 29th, we are hosting our online AzureCon event – which is a free online event with 60 technical sessions on Azure presented by both the Azure engineering team as well as MVPs and customers who use Azure today and will share their best practices. I’ll be kicking off the event with a keynote at 9am PDT.  Watch it to learn the latest on Azure, and hear about a lot of exciting new announcements.  We’ll then have some fantastic sessions that you can watch throughout the day to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, .net

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