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In my previous post, I discussed a problem in missing data over TCP connection that happened in a racy manner, only every few hundred runs. As it turns out, there is a simple way to make the code run into the problem every single time. The full code for the repro can be found here. Change these lines: And voila, you will consistently run into the problem .  Wait, run that by me again, what is going on here? As it turns out, the issue is in the server, more specifically, here and here. We use...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Service Bus and the new Azure portal – Shubha Vijayasarathy SQL Server 2014 Service Pack 2 – Sergio Govoni Information A Peek into F# 4.1 – The Visual F# Team How Aurelia Works – Jeremy Danyow akka : "hello world" – Sacha Barber Tuples in C# 7 – Thomas Levesque .NET Core: Using existing […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

In this article, I am going to explain the uses of unit testing and writing unit test cases in C#.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles






Learn to load CSV from browser with KnockoutJS and more...

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles

In this article, we will learn how to make our BookBot using Node.js and REST APIs, for providing additional information, like book descriptions and price for the book.

Source Feed: C-Sharpcorner Latest Articles



Information Tiny Steps: Creating Fixie 2.0 – Partick Lioi AkkA series – Sacha Barber Reducing allocations and resource usages when using Task.Delay – Ayende The Minimal ASPNET Core App – Steve Smith Sketchy Thoughts on Bots/Agents/Conversations – Mike Taulty SQL Server Statistics Basics – Robert Sheldon JavaScript Promises 101 – Ire Aderinokun How To Use […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

In my previous posts, I talked about tri state waiting, which included the following line: And then I did a deep dive into how timers on the CLR are implemented. Taken together, this presents me somewhat of a problem. What is the cost of calling a Task.Delay? Luckily, the code is there, so we can check. The relevant costs are here. We allocate a new DelayPromise, and a Timer instance. As we previously saw, actually creating a Timer instance will take a global lock, and the cost of actually...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Introducing Stack Overflow Documentation – Craig Dunn Introducing Stack Overflow Documentation Beta – Kevin Montrose Azure Diagnostic Logs can now be streamed to Event Hubs – John Kemnetz Information I wanna go fast: HTTPS’ massive speed advantage – Refactor This: The Gilded Rose Kata for .NET Core – Bobby Johnson How timers works in […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

One of the coolest things about the CoreCLR being open sourced is that I can trawl through the source code and read random parts of the framework. One of the reasons to do this, is to be able to understand the implementation concerns, not just the design, which than allows us to produce a much better output. In this case, I was investigating a hunch, and I found myself deep inside the code that runs the timers in .NET. The relevant code is here, and it is clearly commented as well as quite...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

Software Explore iOS 10, tvOS 10, watchOS 3, and macOS Sierra Previews Today – Miguel de Icaza Visual Rx 3.0.0 – Bnaya Eshet Information Integrating AutoMapper with ASP.NET Core DI – Jimmy Bogard Understanding ASP.NET Core Initialization – Ed Charbeneau Key Steps in Developing .NET Core Applications – Damir Dobric / Andreas Erben No ConfigurationManager […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

Software jQuery 3.1.0 Released – No More Silent Errors – Timmy Willison MediatR Extensions for Microsoft Dependency Injection Released – Jimmy Bogard ReSharper Ultimate 2016.2 EAP: Builds 7 and 8 – Dmitry Matveev Information ASP.NET Community Standup – July 19th, 2016 – ASP.NET Team The week in .NET – 7/19/2016 – Stacey Haffner Microsoft Azure […]

Source Feed: The Morning Brew
Categories: .net, development, morning brew

RavenDB has quite a bit of tests. Over five thousands of them, on the last count. They test common things (like saving a document works) and esoteric things (like spatial query behavior near the equator). They are important, but they also take quite a lot of time to run. In our current setup, running the full test suite can take 3 – 6 hours, depending on which build agent is running and what is the configuration we have. This means that in terms of actually running the tests, developers can’t...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

We recently had the need to develop a feature that requires a client to hold a connection to the server and listen to a certain event. Imagine that we are talking about a new document arriving to the database. This led to a very simple design: Open a TCP connection and let the server know about which IDs you care about. Wait for any of those IDs to change. Let the client know about it. Effectively, it was: Unfortunately, this simple design didn’t quite work. As it turns out, having a...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

I’m currently in the process of getting some benchmark numbers for a process we have, and I was watching some metrics along the way. I have mentioned that disk’s speed can be effected by quite a lot of things. So here are two metrics, taken about 1 minute apart in the same benchmark. This is using a Samsung PM871 512GB SSD drive, and it is currently running on a laptop, so not the best drive in the world, but certainly a respectable one. Here is the steady state operation while we are doing a...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

This is a fun series to write, but I’m running out of topics where I can speak about the details at a high level without getting into nitty gritty details that will make no sense to anyone but database geeks. If you have any suggestions for additional topics, I would love to hear about them. This post, however, is about another aspect of running a database engine. It is all about knowing what is actually going on in the system. A typical web application has very little state (maybe some...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

A lot of the complexities involved in actually building a database engine aren’t related to the core features that you want to have. They are related to what looks like peripheral concerns. Backup / restore is an excellent example of that. Obviously, you want your database engine to have support for backup and restore. But at the same time, actually implementing that (efficiently and easily) is not something that can be done trivially. Let us consider Redis as a good example; in order to...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien

In my previous post, I have tested journal writing techniques on Linux, in this post, I want to do the same for Windows, and see what the impact of the various options are the system performance. Windows has slightly different options than Linux. In particular, in Windows, the various flags and promises and very clear, and it is quite easy to figure out what is it that you are supposed to do. We have tested the following scenarios Doing buffered writes (pretty useless for any journal file,...

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien


We were doing some perf testing recently, and we got some odd results when running a particular benchmark on Linux. So we decided to check this on a much deeper level. We got an AWS macine ( i2.2xlarge – 61 GB, 8 cores, 2x 800 GB SSD drive, running Ubuntu 14.04, using kernel version 3.13.0-74-generic, 1GB/sec EBS drives ) and run the following code and run it. This tests the following scenarios on a 1GB file (pre allocated) and “committing” 65,536 (64K) transactions with 16KB of data in each....

Source Feed: Ayende @ Rahien



With Xamarin, you develop in C# and have the power of the .NET framework behind you. Xamarin does the heavy lifting of translating your C# code to the native mobile OS.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content


Learn how Edge.js solves the problem of marshalling between .NET and Node.js, allowing each of these server-side platforms to run in-process with one another in Windows, Linux and Mac.

Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content


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Source Feed: DevX: Latest .NET Content


I’ll be in the UK next week presenting at the free AzureCraft event being held on June 3rd and 4th.  This event was created by the UK Azure User Group and is a great way to learn about Azure as well as engage with the Azure community in the UK. What’s new in Azure Talk I’ll be speaking on June 3rd from 9:30-11:30am on “What’s new in Azure”.  It is going to have a lot of new content and highlight some of the cool new services and capabilities in Azure that developers might not have had a chance...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, .net, community news, data

Yesterday, the NuGet team announced that NuGet.org reached one billion package downloads! It’s exciting to see NuGet still going strong. As part of the original team that created NuGet, we always had high hopes for its future but were also cognizant of all the things that could go wrong. So seeing hope turn into reality is a great feeling. At the same time, there is still so much more to do. One billion is just a number, albeit a significant and praiseworthy one. I love that the post calls...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

The tagline for the Atom text editor is “A hackable text editor for the 21st Century”. As a Haack, this is a goal I can get behind. It accomplishes this hackability by building on Electron, a platform for building cross-platform desktop applications with web technology (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript). The ability to leverage these skills in order to extend your text editor is really powerful. I thought I’d put this to the test by building a simple extension for Atom. I decided to port the...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

As an open source maintainer, it’s important to recognize and show appreciation for contributions, especially external contributions. We’ve known for a while that after a person’s basic needs are met, money is a poor motivator and does not lead to better work. This seems especially true for open source projects. Often, people are motivated by other intrinsic factors such as the recognition and admiration of their peers, the satisfaction of building something that lasts, or because they need...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Some people, when confronted with a problem, think “I know, I’ll use regular expressions.” Now they have two problems. - Jamie Zawinski For other people, when confronted with writing a blog post about regular expressions, think “I know, I’ll quote that Jamie Zawinski quote!” It’s the go to quote about regular expressions, but it’s probably no surprise that it’s often taken out of context. Back in 2006, Jeffrey Friedl tracked down the original context of this statement in a fine piece of...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

As the role of mobile devices in people's lives expands even further, mobile app developers have become a driving force for software innovation. At Microsoft, we are working to enable even greater developer innovation by providing the best experiences to all developers, on any device, with powerful tools, an open platform and a global cloud. As part of this commitment I am pleased to announce today that Microsoft has signed an agreement to acquire Xamarin, a leading platform provider for...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: mobile, azure, .net, visual studio

Vacation, All I ever wanted Vacation, Had to get away Vacation, Meant to be spent alone Lyrics by The Go Go’s When I joined GitHub four years ago, I adored its unlimited paid time off benefit. It’s not that I planned to take a six month trek across Nepal (or the more plausible scenario of playing X-Box in my pajamas for six months), but I liked the message it sent. It told me this company valued its employees, wanted them to not burn out, and trusted them to behave like stakeholders in...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

A long time request of http://semver.org/ (just shy of five years!) is to be able to link to specific headings and clauses of the Semver specification. For example, want to win that argument about PATCH version increments? Link to that section directly. Today I pushed a change to semver.org that implements this. Go try it out by hovering over any section heading or list item in the main specification section! Sorry for the long delay. I hope to get the next feature request more promptly, like...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Over on the GitHub Engineering blog my co-worker Jesse Toth published a fascinating post about the Ruby library named Scientist we use at GitHub to help us run experiments comparing new code against the existing production code. It’s an enjoyable read with a really great analogy comparing this approach to building a new bridge. The analogy feels very relevant to those of us here in the Seattle area as we’re in the midst of a major bridge construction project across Lake Washington as they...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

I have a big problem as a dad. For the most part, my kids are wonderful. Like most kids, they have their infuriating moments. But that’s not the problem of which I speak. It may help for me to describe one such scenario. My family and I are in Portland for a brief trip. As I drove around an unfamiliar location, my daughter asked the typical question kids ask as a form of advanced psychological torture, “Are we there yet?” This wasn’t so bad. My wife calmly explained to my daughter not to...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

12/31/2015
I planned to skip the tried and true year in review post because who reads such drivel anyways, amirite? They feel like one big exercise in vanity. But it dawned on me. Perhaps, I lost touch with what blogging was all about. What it’s always been all about. Hasn’t it always been one big unabashed and unashamed exercise in vanity? Though writers better than me tend to couch it as something that sounds more virtuous with words like “write for yourself” and such while they smirk awash in the...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Like many developers, I have many strong opinions about things that really do not matter. Even worse, I have the vanity to believe other developers want to read about it. For example, a recent Octokit.net pull request changed all instances of String to string. As a reminder, String actually represents the type System.String and string is the nice C# alias for System.String. To the compiler, these are the exact same thing. So ultimately, it doesn’t really matter. However, as I just said, I...

Source Feed: You've Been Haacked

Yesterday we held our AzureCon event and were fortunate to have tens of thousands of developers around the world participate.  During the event we announced several great new enhancements to Microsoft Azure including: General Availability of 3 new Azure regions in India Announcing new N-series of Virtual Machines with GPU capabilities Announcing Azure IoT Suite available to purchase Announcing Azure Container Service Announcing Azure Security Center We were also fortunate to be joined on...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news

Today, I’m happy to announce several key additions to our big data services in Azure, including the General Availability of HDInsight on Linux, as well as the introduction of our new Azure Data Lake and Language services. General Availability of HDInsight on Linux Today we are announcing general availability of our HDInsight service on Ubuntu Linux.  HDInsight enables you to easily run managed Hadoop clusters in the cloud.  With today’s release we now allow you to configure these clusters to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, sql server, hadoop

This Tuesday, Sept 29th, we are hosting our online AzureCon event – which is a free online event with 60 technical sessions on Azure presented by both the Azure engineering team as well as MVPs and customers who use Azure today and will share their best practices. I’ll be kicking off the event with a keynote at 9am PDT.  Watch it to learn the latest on Azure, and hear about a lot of exciting new announcements.  We’ll then have some fantastic sessions that you can watch throughout the day to...

Source Feed: ScottGu's Blog
Categories: azure, community news, .net

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