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An ape that touched millions imparted some hard lessons about primate research.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category>

In what may be the tomb of the grandmother of the first emperor of China, scientists unexpectedly discovered the bones of an extinct and hitherto unknown species of gibbon, a new study reveals. These findings suggest there was a higher level of ape diversity after the last ice age than previously thought, and that the number of primate extinctions due to humans has likely been underestimated. In 2004, researchers excavated a tomb in the city of Xi'an in China, once the ancient capital Chang'a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The brain is an enormously complex thing. Trying to suss out the genetic overlap of the disorders that strike it is perhaps even more complicated. Still, the Brainstorm Consortium, a collaboration of researchers from Harvard, Stanford and MIT, is aiming to do just that. A new study put out by the group shows there are distinctions in how psychiatric and neurological disorders relate to each other; some personality traits may even be at play. The study, led by Verneri Anttila, a brain

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The world is truly awful at recycling. Less than 10 percent of all plastic ever produced has been recycled — the rest goes to landfills and litter. And of that sliver of plastic that we do recycle, about half of it is shipped from wealthy nations to developing ones — especially China. Together with Hong Kong, China has imported nearly three-quarters of all global plastic waste in recent decades. And that’s how we ended up in this current mess. End Of Recycling Last year, China’s “Nati

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Albert Einstein’s name is synonymous with intelligence, but he’s more than earned his rep. The man revolutionized physics when he was in his 20s and 30s. He came up with a whole new way of understanding reality, not as a fixed grid against which events occur, but as fundamentally intertwined with time and perception. Trying to prove Einstein wrong, somehow, is a perennial goal of budding and experienced physicists alike. Well, they’ll have to keep trying. A new study in Science today show

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Alan Chan grew up thinking humans would be living in space and exploring Mars by now. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Instead, he decided to explore space on his own by creating a video game that allows people to drive around the Red Planet’s actual terrain in a souped-up rover. “Red Rover,” a new video game, recreates Mars' surface using satellite and terrain data from NASA’s HiRISE Mars orbiter. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has a lens that’s photographed M

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The bacterium Treponema pallidum is a nasty critter. It can lead to a number of conditions, collectively called treponemal diseases, that you definitely don't want to have. They include syphilis, a typically sexually transmitted disease that still infects millions annually. The origins of the disease have long been the subject of controversy, attempts to find its roots hampered by a lack of ancient genetic material. Today, researchers announce the first successful reconstruction of ancien

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Scientists have made the most precise test of Einstein’s theory of gravity at great distances.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category>

Coffee’s heart-healthy effects rely on boosting cells’ energy production, a study in mice suggests.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physiology">genes & cells/physiology</category>

Clusters of proteins transiently work together to turn on genes, new microscopy studies of live cells suggest.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category>

Researchers have discovered a new gibbon species in an ancient royal Chinese tomb. It's already extinct.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category>

Koko, a gorilla who was instrumental in expanding our knowledge of the inner lives and abilities of primates, has died at the age of 46. The western lowland gorilla was born at the San Francisco Zoo in 1971 on the Fourth of July — her given name was Hanabi-ko, Japanese for "fireworks child" — and was trained in sign language from a young age. Koko proved to be an adept learner and would go on to learn over 1,000 signs for human words, letting her communicate thoughts, feelings and desires

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

I read once that if you want to keep a giraffe in captivity you have to capture it when it is young because an adult giraffe will fight to the death to be free. The story was in the book “Zarafa” by Michael Allin, and while I don’t think the statement is scientifically correct, I have always appreciated the inspiring imagery that it offers. There is perhaps no other time in history when giraffes needed such strength of heart and indomitable spirits than now. In March, the Intern

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Overeating is a growing problem. But what makes us overeat? Obviously, delicious food can be hard to resist, but that's clearly not the only factor. Here, scientists explored whether feeling overweight changes how we eat. It turns out that wearing a suit designed to make one feel obese did change participants' eating habits -- but only for women. Women, but not men, ate more snack food when wearing the fatsuits, even in private. The scientists were not able to determine why this was true, bu

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

What if you had to find your way through hundreds of miles of unknown territory with only your eyes and a simple compass to guide you? That’s what the Australian Bogong moth does in its annual migration, flying over 600 miles (roughly 30 million times its body length) to seek a haven from summer heat in the cool caves of the Australian Alps. An international team of researchers announced in the journal Current Biology that Bogong moths rely on a magnetic sense as well as vision to steer i

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The long-term effects of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border need to be studied, scientists say.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/psychology">humans & society/psychology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

In a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode from 2007, Larry David and his wife Cheryl and their friends attend a ceremony to celebrate his public donation to the National Resources Defense Council, a non-profit environmental advocacy group. Little does he know that the actor Ted Danson, his arch-frenemy, also donated money, but anonymously. “Now it looks like I just did mine for the credit as opposed to Mr. Wonderful Anonymous,” David tells Cheryl. David feels upstaged, as if his public donation has

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Though he died 5300 years ago in the Alps near the Austrian-Italian border, the prehistoric man known as Ötzi the Iceman has had a remarkable afterlife in the sciences. His mummified body chiseled out of ice in 1991 has undergone extensive examination, revealing details about his life and times. The work has offered a glimpse into the everyday life of Alpine inhabitants in the late 4th millennium BC. A paper published Wednesday in PLOS One reveals the extent to which the Iceman maintained

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Even with a wetsuit, a cold water dive can be a bone-chilling experience. In Arctic waters, divers typically last only an hour, and even that short time can lead to numb, painful extremities. But, by improving on a design already used in nature, researchers say that they’ve turned regular wetsuits into what they call “artificial blubber,” greatly increasing their performance with just a simple treatment. Fighting the Chills Currently the only viable cold-water alternatives to wet suits

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

When it comes to fleshing out dinosaurs, so to speak, based on their nearest living relatives, paleontologists can look to birds or the crocodilians. But a new study says depicting most dinosaur tongues like those of birds with particularly mobile mouthpieces, well, that's just a crock. Tongues aren't much more than a hunk of mouth muscle without the hyoid apparatus, a group of bones that varies significantly between species and provides your mouthmeat with both an anchor and a kind of

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The 2018 Geology World Cup continues! Remember, vote for the other groups so far: Group A, Group B, Group C, Group D. Group E Brazil Let's not beat around the bush, Brazil has the Amazon. One of the most remarkable river systems on the planet, it dominates the central portion of the country and flushes an amazing amount of sediment from the base of the Andes to the west out into the Atlantic to the east. But that's not all! The only flood basalt province in South America sits in the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Even very young toddlers like to help, a social skill that’s linked to later success in school and life.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/parenting">growth curve/parenting</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/child-development">growth curve/child development</category>

There's a significant gap between the information that real-world forensics teams can glean from a crime scene and what turns up in glamorized tv shows such as "CSI." Today, however, that gap gets a little smaller: Researchers reveal it's possible to determine the age of the person based on their blood. Let's face it, as impressive as forensic DNA analysis is, it takes weeks or even months to process and even then can't tell investigators everything about an individual. Other methods of

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Painted ladies migrate the farthest of any butterfly.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category>

Giving robots instructions via brain waves and hand gestures could help the machines operate more safely and efficiently.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/robotics">math & technology/robotics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

More than 100,000 people in the United States need an organ transplant, but demand always outpaces supply. An average of 20 people in the nation died every day in 2016 because organs were unavailable, and that was despite record annual donations of more than 33,000. Physicians have proposed many solutions to encourage organ donations, including payment. But scientists are looking elsewhere to ensure a better supply. Thanks to advances in genetic engineering, a new twist on using anima

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

An advanced alien civilization might combat the impact of dark energy by harvesting stars.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category>

After almost 40 years, scientists have discovered that Jupiter has lightning that is similar to lightning on Earth — it just happens in a different place.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cosmology">atom & cosmos/cosmology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

The eruption on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone continues onward, with Fissure 8 building an impressive cinder cone similar to the one that was formed during the 1960 eruption that the current lavas have wrapped around (see map below). The cinder cone, built by the fountaining of lava from fissure 8, is now over 50 meters (170 feet) tall with a pulsating lava fountain that reaches 20-50 meters (60-165 feet). All this lava is feeding a very entrenched lava flow that is still reaching the ocean

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Asian common toad, an invasive species in Madagascar, produces a toxin in its skin that’s probably toxic to most of the island’s predators.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things">wild things</category>

As a giant complex of thunderstorms blew across Iowa and into Illinois and Missouri on June 14, the GOES-16 weather satellite was watching — and mapping the crackling lightning discharges. The result is the video above, originally posted to the terrific GOES-16 Loop of the Day site. I found it so compelling that I wanted to share it here at ImaGeo. You're looking at a "mesoscale convective system" — a group of thunderstorms that organize into a large complex. And this MCS is indeed ver

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Venus’ thick atmosphere can push on mountains on the surface, changing its rotation period by a few minutes every day.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

He is arguably the most famous ancient American baby: an infant First American whose partial remains were found 50 years ago on a Montana ranch. But while Anzick-1, as the child is known, changed our understanding of the human history of the Americas, critics have complained the dates around the burial are messy, and throw the significance of the site into question. Today, researchers announce the results of a second look at the dating discrepancy that's caused controversy over the famous

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

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Researchers are using smartphones to tap into the ups and downs of suicidal thinking that occur over hours and days, hoping to help prevent suicides.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/psychology">humans & society/psychology</category>

Scientists aren’t sure what’s killing the oldest African baobabs, nine of which have lost big chunks or died in the last 13 years.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

Revamping the accelerator’s equipment will increase the rate of proton collisions.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Scientists made a map of the magnetic field within the Pillars of Creation, a star-forming area depicted in an iconic Hubble Space Telescope image.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

Despite an unverified discovery in 1968, spacetime ripples remained elusive for nearly 50 years.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category>

Leaf-cutter ants struggle to carry wet leaves, so they run to avoid rain.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category>

About 40 percent of high school students are having sex, the lowest amount in the last three decades.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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