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Tiny protrusions are from chemical reactions in the paint, say scientists who developed an imaging method that could help curators track the knobs.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Mother’s milk provides sustenance for babies. Now researchers find pumped breast milk exposes newborns to more disease-causing bacteria than milk directly from the breast. The discovery suggests breastfeeding practices could shift the makeup of microorganisms in breast milk and infants’ digestive systems. “We were surprised that the method of feeding was the most consistent factor associated with milk microbiota composition,” said Meghan Azad, a medical geneticist at the Children’s Hospit

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In November, NASA tapped nine private spaceflight companies who will be allowed to bid on upcoming projects. Yesterday, they elaborated on what those projects would be during an industry forum. Starting as early as this year, NASA hopes to send commercial landers to the lunar surface as the first step toward returning to the moon, this time for good. Long Lunar To-Do List There’s a lot of work to be done before permanent or long-term lunar activities can begin. The first tasks will be to p

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Quantum squeezing of light will help scientists make better gravitational wave detectors.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/quantum-physics">matter & energy/quantum physics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/editors-picks/gravitational-waves">gravitational waves</category>


Particle physics sheds new light on the electric potential of thunderstorms.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

Climate change is real. It’s happening now. And it presents significant problems for the U.S. across multiple facets of society, according to a panel of climate and policy experts that testified before the House Science, Space and Technology Committee Wednesday in Washington, D.C. The testimonials were part of the House Science Committee's first full hearing of the 116th Congress and one of only a handful in the last eight years to address climate change. But that's about to change. In her op

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

I’ll just come right out and say it: Scientists have created human-controlled rat cyborgs. Lest you think this is some media sensationalism at work, here’s the actual title of the paper under discussion, which came out last week in Scientific Reports: “Human Mind Control of Rat Cyborg’s Continuous Locomotion with Wireless Brain-to-Brain Interface.” That pretty much says it all. Some of this tech — such as brain-brain interfaces (BBIs) and rat cyborgs — is nothing new in science, so in

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

From the NIH/ National Network of Libraries of Medicine Libraries are hubs for discovery and community engagement; imagine your library joining a real-time event with others around the world and contributing to real scientific research to speed up Alzheimer’s research! Citizen Science Day 2019 is Saturday, April 13. You and your library are invited to participate in the Stall Catchers Megathon, in which people all over the world will analyze real research data in a game format that would

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

It's finally here. This morning, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made it official: El Niño conditions are present in the tropical Pacific Ocean. There's a 90 percent chance that they'll continue through winter, and a 60 percent chance through spring. True to predictions, this El Niño is a weakling. Climate scientist Emily Becker summarized the situation at the ever-awesome ENSO blog: After several months of flirting, the tropical Pacific ocean and atmosphere app

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Extreme heat and temperature swings are no match for this lightweight insulator.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/materials">matter & energy/materials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Citizen science (public participation in scientific research) often calls for tools you won’t find lying around the house, such as a rain gauge to record precipitation or an air quality sensor. “I think a database of water quality monitoring tools is something that anyone who samples recreational water quality dreams of: the idea of a one-stop-shop for such information would be incredibly helpful and save a lot of time for the people and volunteers that run water quality monitoring pr

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Inside Science) -- Perhaps it's not a coincidence that Valentine's Day falls at a chilly time of year. In biological terms, social drives like love may be bound up with the need to keep warm. The same hormone, oxytocin, helps regulate both physical and emotional warmth, increasing body heat and facilitating social bonding. And according to recent research, baby mice deprived of the hormone are less likely to cuddle with other mice or crawl toward heated surfaces. "We're working with i

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Warmer, more lively house flies could spread more Campylobacter bacteria by landing on more food.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

In 1969, peregrine falcons were at risk of extinction. But a ban on the pesticide DDT and new captive breeding programs allowed the raptors to recover.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/toxicology">earth & environment/toxicology</category>

(Inside Science) -- In 60 years, the climate of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will feel kind of like a contemporary Jonesboro, Arkansas, with higher temperatures and more winter precipitation, according to a new study. That's assuming fossil fuel emissions continue to rise; if instead we succeed in curbing emissions, Pittsburgh will instead become more like Madison, Indiana. Pittsburgh is one of 540 cities in the U.S. and Canada for which scientists have found doppelgangers of their climate f

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

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A new study describes how sperm navigate narrow straits in the reproductive tract’s obstacle course to reach an egg.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/development">genes & cells/development</category>

On January 24, 2004, the Opportunity rover sent back its first signal from the Red Planet. That marked the start of a 90-day planned mission for the six-wheeled, golf cart-sized rover. Fifteen years later, the rover’s mission has finally ended, NASA announced today. Its longevity and discoveries are a testament to Opportunity’s design and construction. The rover ultimately sent back more than 200,000 raw images and traveled a total of 28 miles (45 kilometers), farther than a standard mara

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

After 15 years of exploring Mars, a dust storm led to the demise of NASA’s longest-lived rover.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

The Opportunity rover, like its twin Spirit, was designed for an original mission of just three months. When engineers lost contact on June 10 of last year, it had been exploring for fourteen years. And today, mission scientists finally declared an official end to the mission. Here are just a few of Opportunity's many successes during its long Red Planet expedition. Heat Shield Rock Opportunity discovered the first meteorite on Mars, sitting near its own heat shield. While a few meteor

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Hailing from East Africa, the newly described giant, plant-eating dinosaur Mnyamawamtuka moyowamkia lived around 100-110 million years ago, during the middle of the Cretaceous. The animal, a member of the titanosaur lineage, is helping paleontologists understand how, where and when the mightiest of land animals evolved. Sauropodomorphs are some of the most common and geographically diversely dinosaurs in the fossil record, and their shape — small head, long neck, big torso, elephant-lik

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

After some 15 prolific years on the Martian surface, NASA's Mars Opportunity rover has gone silent. And after an all out effort to re-establish contact, the space agency says it's given up hopes of ever hearing back from the rover. We talked to the NASA engineers and scientists whose lives have been touched by the Opportunity rover about their experiences and what the craft meant to them. For some researchers, the mission has encompassed their entire career. For others, the spacecraft team w

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nearly 10 percent of Americans have diabetes, a chronic condition where the body does not process sugar. Diabetics either do not make enough insulin — a hormone that acts like a key to let sugars into cells to use for energy — or cells stop responding to insulin. As a result, sugar builds up in the bloodstream leading to high blood sugar. Over time, high blood sugar can give rise to nerve damage and heart disease among other complications. Now researchers have reprogrammed human cells tha

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

NASA will hold a briefing at 2pm EST today on the status of its Mars Opportunity Rover, which has been out of communication since June 10, 2018, when dust storms enveloped the planet. Mission scientists have been trying to rouse the rover since dust storms subsided in October, but have been unsuccessful so far. Previous reporting indicated that few options were left for Opportunity. Winter is coming on Mars, and the low temperatures could permanently damage the rover if it can't power its

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Quantum particles seem to disobey a fundamental principle of mathematics.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/numbers">math & technology/numbers</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/quantum-physics">matter & energy/quantum physics</category>

A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,  “Learning Through Citizen Science: Enhancing Opportunities by Design” in now available in print. “In the last twenty years, citizen science has blossomed as a way to engage a broad range of individuals in doing science. Citizen science projects focus on, but are not limited to, nonscientists participating in the processes of scientific research, with the intended goal of advancing and using scientific knowledg

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Last November, scientists' minds were blown by the discovery of a 19-mile-wide crater under Greenland. The crater had been hiding in plain sight just 150 miles from a major air force base. Scientists flying airborne surveys with NASA’s Operation IceBridge found it serendipitously while testing their equipment while en route to collect Arctic data. And, on Monday, the same group announced they’ve found another potential impact crater that's even larger, and it sits just over 100 miles from th

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

As humans get more ambitious with their plans for exploring Mars, we’re going to need to land bigger spacecraft on its surface. Up until now, NASA's robotic missions have used parachutes, inflatable bubbles, and sky cranes, as well as descent rockets. But to land the kind of heavy spaceships that can carry human astronauts to Mars, engineers will need new methods to touch down. At the moment, most spacecraft rely on parachutes to slow down from a whopping Mach 30 or so as they enter the M

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Ever catch yourself letting out a frustrated sigh, a squeal of delight or maybe a gasp of terror? These off-the-cuff vocalizations are called vocal bursts. And in a new study, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley have mapped out a record number of them. To start things off, the researchers asked 56 people, some professional actors and some not, to react to different emotional scenarios. From these reactions, the team recorded more than 2,000 vocal bursts. Next, they

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A newly designed material uses only light to speedily remove 99.9999 percent of microbes from water.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

There may be yet another large crater buried beneath Greenland’s ice sheet. But it’s probably not related to the first one found last year.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

Educational robots show promise for helping kids in the classroom or at home, but researchers are still figuring out how these bots should behave.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/robotics">math & technology/robotics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>



A 240-million-year-old fossil reveals the oldest known case of bone cancer in an amniote, a group that includes mammals, birds and reptiles.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

Readers had comments and questions about defining artificial intelligence, the New Horizons space mission and more.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/artificial-intelligence">math & technology/artificial intelligence</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the history of neuroscience and new techniques scientists are using to influence the brain.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

Researchers are using electric jolts to correct the faulty brain activity that sparks depression.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category>

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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