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The Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung (1875-1961) was one of the best-known psychologists of the 20th century. He introduced such famous concepts as introverted and extraverted personalities, and the idea of the psychological 'complex'. Today, Jungian or analytical psychology retains an active community. But a recently published Open Letter from a number of prominent Jungians points to troubles within the fold. The letter acknowledges that Jung's writings contained racism, and apologizes for

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Beta Pictoris c, the large planet in the foreground of this artist’s concept, orbits the star Beta Pictoris much more closely than Beta Pictoris b, which is a similarly massive planet located farther out in the system. (Credit: P. Rubini/A.M. Lagrange) The Beta Pictoris system swirls with activity — a dusty disk of debris, comets falling toward the central star, and at least one giant planet. And now, astronomers have uncovered evidence for yet another planetary Goliath, some nine times the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Shutterstock) The roots of mental illness are still a mystery. But researchers think our mental health is shaped by a combination of factors, like genetics, our developmental environment and our life experiences. But there’s one factor that scientists say may have gone unnoticed. It appears that where we live, and how polluted it is, can increase our likelihood of developing a mental illness. That's according to a new large-scale population study published in PLOS Biology

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Medications for better sleep are ubiquitous. But they're no cure-all. (Credit: YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock) The importance of a good night’s rest cannot be overstated. Poor sleep is linked to all-cause mortality, which means getting too little or too much sleep are “significant predictors of death,” according to a 2010 meta-analysis study. But good sleep is increasingly a privilege, as stress, workloads and the trappings of a modern lifestyle squeeze out valuable shut-eye. Naturally

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Olena Yakobchuk/Shutterstock) If you've ever wondered how likely you are to die in the next five to 10 years, scientists may now have an answer for you. Researchers identified 14 molecules in blood that are associated with dying from any cause. They say a score based on the molecules can predict one’s risk of death. But the ominous foretelling is not all bad. Scientists say it may encourage lifestyle interventions and help with treatment decisions. “The association of our biomark

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

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Psoriasis causes new skin cells to grow in days rather than weeks. New skin builds up rapidly, forming thick patches and scales on the surface.

Source Feed: Livescience.com

Skeleton Lake, formally known as Roopkund Lake, sits at more than 16,000 feet above sea levels in the Himalayas. (Credit: Atish Waghwase) At the mysterious Skeleton Lake in northern India, the dead are talking, revealing surprises through centuries-old DNA. And it's not what anyone expected. New research suggests the site is not the scene of a single natural disaster that killed hundreds, as once thought. Skeleton Lake's emerging truth is far more mysterious. The human bones littering its

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A warm bath before bed can help you get to sleep, research shows. (Credit: MyImages - Micha/Shutterstock) About 30 percent of Americans have trouble sleeping. Shahab Haghayegh, a University of Texas biomedical engineer, was one of them. Sleep eluded him. “I always had a hard time fall[ing] asleep,” he told Discover via email.  Over the counter medications like the hormone melatonin and Unisom, a sedating anti-histamine, can help people get to sleep. But the medicines aren’t long-term solu

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


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This blog post is an edited excerpt from Human Impact, a new publication from Science Connected. Edited by Kate Stone and Shayna Keyles, Human Impact delivers 17 true tales of how humanity has changed the Earth, for better or for worse. This chapter appears in Human Impact as “Act Now: Engaging in Citizen Science,” and includes contributions from Caroline Nickerson, Kristin Butler, and Julia Travers. Act Now: Engaging in Citizen Science Citizen science is a field as broad as scien

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Spiraling cloud patterns called Von Kármán vortices, spotted at nighttime off the coast of Morocco on July 19, 2019 by the Suomi NPP satellite. (Source: NASA Earth Observatory) Spiraling cloud formations are often visible in satellite images — but at night, as seen above? Until recently, that has been rare, at best. But newer technology for sensing and processing light in the shortwave infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum has made it easier for satellites to spot these von Kármá

Source Feed: Discover Magazine




The entrance to Denisova cave, where the ancient humans were first discovered. (Credit: Igor Boshin/Shutterstock) Nestled in foothills of Russia’s Altai Mountains, Denisova Cave has been a research mecca since 2010, when fossil DNA from the site revealed a previously unknown human lineage, now called the Denisovans. Scientists have been working hard to reconstruct the cave’s history, through ongoing excavations as well as new analyses of materials recovered years ago. First, what everyone

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Astronomers using the Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that exoplanet LHS 3844b probably lacks any atmosphere at all. (Credit: ESO/NASA) Rocky planets just a little larger than Earth are some of the best targets for finding life in our local cosmic neighborhood. They're abundant. But it’s not just the size that has to match Earth. Our planet wouldn’t be the life-sheltering place it is without its atmosphere, which keeps us warm enough not to freeze, but not so hot that we smother or boil a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine



Nerve cells in an important memory center in the brain sync their firing and create fast ripples of activity seconds before a recollection resurfaces.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: body & brain/health, body & brain/neuroscience







Left-handed people are under-represented as volunteers in human neuroimaging studies, according to a new paper from Lyam M. Bailey, Laura E. McMillan, and Aaron J. Newman of Dalhousie University. Bailey et al. analyzed a sample of 1,031 papers published in 2017, finding that just 3.2% of participants were non-right-handed, even though this group makes up about 10-13% of the general population. These findings are hardly unexpected. The exclusion of non-right-handed people from neur

Source Feed: Discover Magazine




Supernova 2016iet is an example of one of the most extreme types of stellar explosions, though it has some odd features. (Credit: Gemini Observatory/NSF/AURA/ illustration by Joy Pollard) In November of 2016, the sharp-eyed Gaia spacecraft spied a supernova that exploded some billion light-years from Earth. Astronomers followed up with more telescopes, and quickly realized that this supernova – dubbed SN2016iet – was an odd one in many ways. For one, the star that caused the supernova se

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Frigid terrain on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, where researchers recently documented microplastic pollution in falling snow. (Credit: Sejsejlija/Shutterstock) When it snows in the Arctic, there's another kind of flake drifting down alongside the ice crystals. Tiny bits of degraded plastic, commonly called microplastics, have been found swirling among the snow in otherwise pristine Arctic environments. Microplastic pollution has previously been found everywhere from city streets

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The full moon has been associated with aberrant behavior for centuries. (Credit: Aron Visuals/Unsplash) It’s sometimes called the "Transylvania effect.” In the dark sky, the clouds shift, revealing the full moon’s eerie silver gleam, and the people on Earth below go mad. It’s a story that gets repeated by doctors, teachers and police officers. The science, though, says something different. Blaming the full moon for strange behavior is a time-honored tradition. In the first century AD, the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nerve cells in the brain that are tied to wakefulness are destroyed in people with Alzheimer’s, a finding that may refocus dementia research.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: body & brain/biomedicine, body & brain/health, body & brain/neuroscience


Most of our planet baked in July — earning the title for hottest month on record, according to two analyses, and in a tie in a third. (Source: NASA GISTEMP) Two analyses out today show that in July, Earth endured its hottest month on record. A third analysis shows last month in a tie with August 2016 for the dubious title of Earth's hottest month in records dating back to the 1880s. Also out today: An update from the National Snow and Ice Data Center shows that Arctic sea ice is curren

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Parasites aplenty riddled humans and their dogs at a swampy site in Bronze Age England. From left: Microscopic eggs of a fish tapeworm, giant kidney worm and Echinostoma worm found in ancient feces from the Must Farm site. (Black scale bar represents 20 micrometers.) (Credit: M. Ledger, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University) Around 3,000 years ago, people were going about their business in a marshy corner of eastern England known as The Fens. These Fenland folk had just built

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University) If you have two functioning legs and a reliable nervous system, walking and running are generally thoughtless tasks. But if you’re a soldier hauling massive amounts of gear on your back for an extended period of time, putting one foot in front of the other can get exhausting. That’s where the idea for a soft, futuristic "exosuit" came about in 2011 – when DARPA funded a project, called Warrior Web. The U.S. Army partnered with researchers fro

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Science News’ forthcoming website won’t feature comment sections on stories, but instead will invite e-mail feedback so readers can make their voices heard.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: transparency project



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