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Science News staff members reported live updates from the March for Science in Washington, D.C., on April 22.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public">science & the public</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

As the March for Science has drawn near, scientists and science-lovers across the country have pontificated at length on why they are—or aren't—marching. But while today's 400-plus demonstrations around the nation will hopefully resonate with lawmakers, it takes more than rallies to accomplish lasting change. The following is a guest post from Dr. Kira Krend, a biology teacher in Honolulu, HI, on her March for Science—one that she does every day.  13,407 steps. The display on my f

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Watch the live stream of the March for Science in Washington, D.C. on April 22.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Is climate change playing any role in an apparent lengthening of the hurricane season? It's way early for hurricane season to start, but that's precisely what happened yesterday with the formation of Tropical Storm Arlene in the far northern Atlantic. Brian McNoldy, a researcher at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, writing at his Tropical Atlantic Update blog, puts this into perspective: . . . this is exactly two months before the average dat

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Copper Age Iceman froze to death, with shoulder and head damage.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category>

The animation, based on data from a NASA airborne observatory, show just how much the state's snowpack has grown The incredible impact of California's drought-busting deluges has now become even clearer, thanks to this compelling new animation from NASA. You're looking at a comparison of snowpack on April 1, 2015 and 2017 in the Tuolumne River Basin of the Sierra Nevada range. Famous Mono Lake is to the right. The entire basin spans more than 1,600 square miles, an area larger than the s

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new article posted on preprint site bioRxiv has generated a lot of interest among neuroscientists on Twitter. The article reports the existence of 'functional connectivity' between surgically disconnected distant brain regions using fMRI, something that in theory shouldn't be possible. This is big news, if true, because it suggests that fMRI functional connectivity isn't entirely a reflection of actual signalling between brain areas. Rather, something else must be able to produce connectivi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The 2003 discovery of the Homo floresiensis added a new, weird branch to the human family tree. At the same time humans were spreading across Asia and Neanderthals were inching toward extinction in Europe (and the mysterious Denisovans were doing … something), this three-and-a-half foot human relative was carving out an existence on the Flores island in what is now Indonesia. But where, exactly, it came from has been a mystery. There were suggestions that it was simply a modern human subj

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Whoever named the sea cucumber after a vegetable didn't give it enough credit. Yes, sea cucumbers are soft, warty tubes that scoot eyelessly along the seafloor. But they aren't helpless. Some secrete a poison that's deadly to other animals. And some, when threatened, shoot sticky threads out of their anuses to tangle up predators. When researchers collected these bizarre weapons and tested them in the lab, they discovered a material that's unique among sea creatures. The threads that sea

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

2017 offers an abundance of scientific anniversaries to celebrate, from pulsars and pulsar planets to Einstein’s laser, Einstein’s cosmos and the laws of robotics.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/context">context</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/history-science">humans & society/history of science</category>

If you have ever struggled to learn a tonal language like Cantonese, you are probably (painfully) aware of how difficult it can be. In tonal languages, the same syllables can have different meanings if spoken with an increasing, neutral, or decreasing pitch. But xenoglossophobes, fear not — these researchers are here to help! They guessed that learning words in Cantonese would be easier and faster if students were first taught to distinguish different tones. To test this idea, they compared stud

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Cassini spacecraft will plunge into Saturn’s atmosphere and disintegrate on Sept. 15, but is slated to do some solid science before its demise.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Though they may look ugly to us, naked mole-rats never want for friendship. The hairless rodents live in large colonies under the earth, inhabiting byzantine warrens under the soil of their native East Africa. They send foraging parties out through the dirt in search of the tree roots and tubers that sustain them, and when it comes time to rest, they gather together in a massive pile to sleep. Their isolation offers security, but being cut off from the surface poses its own dangers. Even

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A set of particle decay measurements could be evidence for new physics.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

In most biology textbooks, there’s a clear separation between the three domains of cellular organisms – Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryotes – and viruses. This fault line is also typically accepted as the divider between life and non-life: since viruses rely on host machinery to enact metabolic transformations and to replicate, they are not self-sufficient, and generally not considered living entities. But several discoveries of giant viruses over the last decade have blurred this distincti

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Immune system cells called macrophages help heart cells rhythmically contract, maintaining the beat of mice’s hearts.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbiology">genes & cells/microbiology</category>

Public engagement is critical to address the challenges of climate change, a complex issue with environmental, social, political and economic ramifications. Common forms of public engagement include public events such as science festivals or café informal settings for experts to share their knowledge with the community. Or public policy forums where community members voice concerns to government representatives and other decision makers. While useful, these approaches to public engagement mai

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new, nearby exoplanet could be just the boilerplate needed to find out if life could exist in untold numbers of star systems. The planet, LHS 1140b, is 39 light years away. It orbits a small M-dwarf star every 24 days. The planet itself is 1.4 times larger and 6.6 times more massive than Earth, and the principal investigators of the study published today in Nature believe it to be rocky. Standout Super-Earth Our list of exoplanets is long — nearly 3,500 strong, with new planets coming

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Half a century later, plate tectonics is well-established but still an active field of research.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

The recent rise in atmospheric methane concentrations may have been caused by changes in atmospheric chemistry, not increased emissions from human activities, two new studies suggest.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

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In general, vaccinating adults who come into close contact with newborns is a good idea, but the practice on its own may not keep whooping cough away.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-development">body & brain/human development</category>

The March for Science may be the first of its kind, science historians say.

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Ocean currents dump plastic garbage from the North Atlantic into previously pristine Arctic waters, new research shows.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>


Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the unexpected nature of science.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

Stinkbug hazards, Great Lakes invaders and more reader feedback.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category>

Fish venom shows great diversity and is being studied to treat pain, cancer and other diseases.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>

Two vibrant bundles of string, over 10,000 feet high in the Peruvian Andes, may hold clues for deciphering the ancient code of the Inca civilization. Kept as heirlooms by the community of San Juan de Collata, the strings are khipus, devices of twisted and tied cords once used by indigenous Andeans for record keeping. Anthropologists have long debated whether khipus were simply memory aids — akin to rosary beads — or a three-dimensional writing system. The latter seems more possible, and d

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Urumin, a protein found in Indian frog mucus secretions, has a knack for taking down H1 flu viruses, a new study finds.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

We human beings are quite fond of our brains. They are one of our largest and most complex organs, weighing in at nearly three pounds (2% of our bodies!). Each contains upwards of 90 billion neurons responsible for controlling our gangly, almost hairless primate bodies as well as processing and storing a lifetime's worth of events, facts and figures. So we protect our brains as best we can, from hats that battle temperature extremes to helmets that buffer even the most brutish blows. Our

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

When people began to settle down, animals followed. Some made successful auditions as our domesticated species. Others — like mice — became our vermin, a new study shows.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/scicurious">scicurious</category>

The man-eaters of Tsavo, two lions that killed railroad workers in Kenya more than a century ago, have inspired legends, movies and a lot of research papers trying to explain what drove the big cats to prey on humans (a rare menu choice for Panthera leo). A study out today finds that, in one crucial way, the infamous killers were a lot like — surprise — zoo animals. For years, the true story of the man-eaters of Tsavo has been embellished and exaggerated, most recently in the 1996 movie T

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The home planet just experienced its second warmest March on record, according to an analysis released by NASA last week. The agency's temperature records go all the way back to 1880 From the analysis: Last month was 1.12 degrees Celsius warmer than the mean March temperature from 1951-1980. The two top March temperature anomalies have occurred during the past two years. Here's how the year so far compares with the seasonal cycle for every year since 1880: It's still early in the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A peptide secreted by a species of Indian frog can destroy variants of the influenza virus. Frogs, with little defensive weaponry to rely on, have armed themselves with a chemical arsenal that gets leached out through their skins. In some frogs, this takes the form of deadly poisons; in others, the chemicals have been known to possess psychoactive properties. Hydrophylax bahuvistara, a species of fungoid frog found in India, secretes a substance that protects against viruses. Researche

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy does not increase the risk of autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, two new large studies suggest.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-development">body & brain/human development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category>

Twitter’s been on fire with people amazed by cats that seem compelled to park themselves in squares of tape marked out on the floor. These felines appear powerless to resist the call of the #CatSquare. This social media fascination is a variation on a question I heard over and over as a panelist on Animal Planet’s “America’s Cutest Pets” series. I was asked to watch video after video of cats climbing into cardboard boxes, suitcases, sinks, plastic storage bins, cupboards and even wide-ne

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nitrogen bubbles may be the source of the “magic island” on Saturn’s moon Titan.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>



A once taboo topic now appears perfectly natural in the animal kingdom. And it’s changing what we know about evolution.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

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Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

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Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

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Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

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Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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