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One of the most potentially dangerous volcanoes in the Cascades is Glacier Peak in Washington. It produced the one of the largest eruptions in the past 20,000 years in this volcanic range that spans from British Columbia to California. Multiple eruptions around 13,500 years ago spread ash all the way into Montana. Over the last 2,000 years, there have been multiple explosive eruptions that have impacted what became Washington state and beyond. Put on top of that the many glaciers on the slop

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Over the past few weeks, the stories of three high-profile scientists accused of bullying have emerged: geneticist Nazneen Rahman, psychologist Tania Singer and astrophysicist Guinevere Kauffmann. Each of these researchers are (or were) at the top of their fields, recipients of huge amounts of funding. They are accused of abuses of power, bullying and abuse of their subordinates and creating a climate of fear in their institutions. It would be easy to look to the personal character

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A scientist's achievements are often measured in terms of the number of papers they publish (productivity) and how many citations those papers get (impact). These 'bibliometric indicators' are widely derided but they have proven remarkably stubborn. Now, in a new preprint on bioRxiv, researchers Peter van den Besselaar and Ulf Sandström propose a new metric that, they say, could measure another important researcher characteristic: independence. For van den Besselaar and Sandström, inde

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Water is a key ingredient for life — and new research suggests we might find it all over the galaxy. Scientists looked at the mass of Super-Earths, a kind of planet common across the cosmos but not present in our own solar system. These rocky worlds are several times larger than Earth, but the team's analysis of known Super-Earths reveals something astounding: Many of them may be literal water worlds. According to the research, many of these planets may be half water. By comparison,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, the demigod and his comrade Enkidu rip out the heart of the Bull of Heaven as a gift to the sun god Shamash. This bloody act is far from the only time sacrifice makes an appearance in the world’s most ancient stories, and in some tales such rituals claim human lives, or almost. In Greek myth, King Agamemnon decides to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia to Artemis as payment for letting the Greek fleet sail to Troy. In the book of Genesis, Abraham near

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Alien it most certainly is not. But the word 'venous' is not far from the mark. So just what is this thing anyway? When I first spotted this mesmerizing animation on Twitter, my mind really did wander to the metaphorical idea of blood flowing through some sort of alien venous system. And actually, to the extent that a river can be the lifeblood of a region, you are looking at something akin to a venous system. The time-lapse animation consists of 14 false-color satellite images of the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Before Voyager 1 and 2 explored the outer solar system, Pioneer 10 and 11 paved the way. Launched in 1972 and 1973, respectively, these spacecraft were the first to transit the asteroid belt and the first to make close observations of Jupiter (both Pioneer 10 and 11) and Saturn (Pioneer 11). Like their successors, the Voyagers and New Horizons, both Pioneers are past the orbit of Pluto and will continue speeding outward from the center of the solar system. Powered by four plutonium-238

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Differences in stem cells in the spinal cord explain the amphibians’ ability.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/development">genes & cells/development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>

Solid cheese preserved in an ancient Egyptian tomb may be the world’s oldest.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

The “Cosmic Seagull,” a distant galaxy magnified by a gravitational lens, seems chock-full of dark matter, in contrast with other galaxies almost as far away.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

On a misty summer morning in 2015, Manuel Ruiz ditched his pickup truck along a dusty two-track road in northwest Tasmania and trod into a grove of eucalyptus. He was searching for a devil. “If I were a devil, this would be a nice place to spend the night,” thought Ruiz, a wildlife veterinarian and doctoral candidate at the University of Tasmania. The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is the world’s largest carnivorous marsupial. Despite that distinction, the animal is only about the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Just last year, three American physicists shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for their role in the historic detection of gravitational waves. The signals came from cosmic ripples in space-time created by some of the most violent events in the universe: colliding black holes. Scientists have now detected six gravitational-wave signals — five from merging pairs of stellar-mass black holes, and one from a merging pair of neutron stars. But strangely, most of the stellar-mass black holes invol

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For a cloud to appear, it takes more than water vapor. Water won't condense into droplets, or nucleate, without a surface to do so on, and this often takes the form of particles floating around the atmosphere so tiny as to be invisible. Called aerosols, these particles play an important role in everything from the pace of climate change to the water cycle because they influence how clouds form and grow. Natural aerosols come from any number of places: Everything from compounds emitted by

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Fire ants’ secret to success is prioritizing efficiency over fairness. Robot teams could use that strategy to work more efficiently in tight, crowded quarters.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/robotics">math & technology/robotics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

In Kurt Vonnegut’s dystopian novel, Player Piano, things get a little awkward after industrialist Dr. Paul Proteus, escorted in a black government limo, passes a crew of “Reeks and Wrecks,” or displaced laborers who could no longer compete economically with the machines that filled factories like Proteus’ Illium Works. In the street, some 40 construction workers are hunched over shovels and pitchforks, all watching a single man fill a two-foot-wide pothole. With an abundance of idle hand

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Wheat is one of the most widely cultivated cereals in the world. About 20 percent of the food humans eat has bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). As the world’s population grows, wheat researchers and breeders have been studying how to get even more out of the cereal. And some estimates say bread wheat production needs to increase by more than half in coming decades to feed everyone. To achieve this, scientists have been tinkering with wheat DNA to improve the health and production of th

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Smoothing out a material used in desalination filters could help combat worldwide water shortages.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/materials">matter & energy/materials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

The smokey conditions are so bad that one Canadian newspaper has labeled it a "smoke-pocalypse" I was going to take a break from covering the wildfires blazing across large swaths of western North America — until I checked on remote sensing data this morning and saw the satellite imagery above and lower down in this post. In the the image above, captured by the Suomi-NPP satellite on Aug. 15, check out the thick, sandy-colored smudge of smoke blanketing a huge portion of western North Am

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

We have an exciting announcement! Beginning in October of this year, SciStarter is partnering with Dr. Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher’s research team to begin publishing monthly book reviews of books focusing on citizen science. Dr. Mehlenbacher’s team at the University of Waterloo includes both undergraduate and graduate students. Housed in the English Department, the team’s research focuses on, among other topics, changing methods of science communication, citizen science, and expertis

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For over 20 years, the U.S. government tried to subdue hurricanes through cloud seeding, with mixed results.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

A new species of beetle, preserved in a piece of amber along with several grains of pollen, is the earliest direct evidence of an insect pollinating an ancient plant group nearly 100 million years ago. It's also just supercool to look at. To understand why this new beetle with the gigantic name (Cretoparacucujus cycadophilus) is more than just a pretty face, we've got to take a stroll down the paleobotany path. The Mesozoic Era started in the wake of the end-Permian mass extinction (

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

[Note from the authors of “Seriously, Science?”: After nine years with Discover, we’ve been informed that this will be our last month blogging on this platform. Despite being (usually) objective scientists, we have a sentimental streak, and we have spent the last few days reminiscing about the crazy, and often funny, science we have highlighted. Therefore, we have assembled a month-long feast of our favorite science papers. Enjoy!] The saying goes "to each his own," and that definitely ho

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

By 2050, half the world’s population may no longer have safe water to drink or grow food. What then?

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

Neutron stars are the remnants of violent supernovas, all that’s left behind when a star tens of times the mass of our sun ends its nuclear fuel-burning life. These extreme objects pack more mass than our sun — about 1.4 suns’ worth of mass, to be more exact — into a stellar remnant about the width of a small city (6 to 12 miles [10 to 20 kilometers]). These tiny, distant objects get their name from the fact that they’re almost entirely composed of neutrons. But they do contain a small f

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A small galaxy some 70 million light-years from Earth has been hiding a big secret. This week, astronomers announced they’d found a supermassive black hole (SMBH) lurking at the center of a galaxy called Fornax UCD3. It’s an odd place for such a giant black hole to survive. Supermassive black holes commonly thrive at the heart of large galaxies — including our own Milky Way — but they’re mostly absent in dwarf galaxies like UCD3. Dwarf galaxies are typically loose assemblages of st

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

BOULDER, Colo. – Severe storms cause tens of billions of dollars in property damage each year. And that cost will likely go up in the coming years thanks in large part to hailstorms. Climate scientists, meteorologists and insurance experts gathered at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) here in Boulder, Colorado, this week for a three-day workshop to discuss how climate change affects these storms and brainstorm how to better detect and forecast them. “It looks like 20

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A long-standing controversy over the date of a volcanic blast that possibly inspired the myth of Atlantis may have been resolved with the aid of ancient tree rings, a new study finds. One of the largest volcanic eruptions in the past 4,000 years burst from the volcano Thera on what is now the Greek island of Santorini. The catastrophic eruptions spewed forth about 40 to 60 cubic kilometers of lava, devastating the ancient seafaring Minoan civilization, potentially inspiring the legend of

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Elementary school children often endorsed unanimous but inaccurate judgments made by small groups of robots.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/robotics">math & technology/robotics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/psychology">humans & society/psychology</category>

Sick phytoplankton shed their calcium carbonate plates more easily than their healthy counterparts, which could play a role in forming clouds.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category>

The impact of global sea level rise varies regionally, thanks to these factors.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category>

For coastal megacities like Mumbai, rising seas and weather chaos linked with climate change threaten economic and social disaster.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

Researchers have found another gene that may play a role in explaining elephants’ cancer resistance.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

It’s getting harder to tell fact from fiction — even on camera.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/computing">math & technology/computing</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

In The Most Unknown, a film on Netflix, a research round robin leads to fascinating discussions about scientific questions.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Two microRNAs may shed light on the causes of nerve pain and itch.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physiology">genes & cells/physiology</category>

A close look at unusual brains offers a way to understand how the human mind is constructed, two new books argue.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

A review of hundreds of scientific studies finds that the label “promiscuous” is applied to a surprisingly wide range of mating behaviors in animals.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category>

The Parker Solar Probe just took off to become the first spacecraft to visit the sun.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

The FDA just approved the first drug that works via RNA interference.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

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Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

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Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

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Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

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Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

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Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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