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A short history of the universe since the time of the Big Bang. We can directly observe more than 13 billion years of change, but the beginning itself is an enduring mystery. (Credit: ESA) The Big Bang is the defining narrative of modern cosmology: a bold declaration that our universe had a beginning and has a finite age, just like the humans who live within it. That finite age, in turn, is defined by the evidence that universe is expanding (again, and unfortunately, many of us are familiar

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A mockup of the Apollo Guidance Computer that navigated Apollo's way to the Moon. MIT Library. Driving, say, to a friend’s house, we usually have directions to follow like “turn left at the light then it’s the third door on the right.” The same isn’t true when going to the Moon; there are no signposts guiding the way. So how exactly did Apollo astronauts know where they were going when they went to the Moon? This one is tough. You can’t just launch a rocket towards the Moon and expect

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

An artist's depiction of space junk. (Credit: ESA) SpaceX’s ambitious Starlink project could eventually launch more than 10,000 satellites into orbit and rewrite the future of the internet. But Elon Musk’s company has been taking heat from the astronomical community after an initial launch in late May released the first 60 satellites. The 500 pound (227 kg) satellites were clearly visible in Earth’s night sky, inspiring concern that they could increase light pollution, interfere with ra

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Temple 1 at the ancient Maya city of Tikal in Guatemala. (Credit: Rob Crandall/Shutterstock) Two trophy skulls, recently discovered by archaeologists in the jungles of Belize, may help shed light on the little-understood collapse of the once powerful Classic Maya civilization. The defleshed and painted human skulls, meant to be worn around the neck as pendants, were buried with a warrior over a thousand years ago at Pacbitun, a Maya city. They likely represent gruesome symbols of military

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Astronomers think the galaxy NGC1313 may be home to an intermediate-mass black hole. Credit: Gemini Observatory/AURA) (Inside Science) -- If you have a computer and a few spare moments, you can help search the cosmos for an elusive breed of black hole that astronomers once thought didn't exist. Black holes come in two main types: stellar-mass black holes, which generally have about 10-24 times the mass of our sun, and the much heavier variant known as supermassive black holes, which can b

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

An artist's rendition shows the dark matter halo (blue) that astronomers believe surrounds the Milky Way. (Credit: ESO/L. Calçada) A massive clump of dark matter may have plowed through a conga line of stars streaming around the Milky Way, according to new research presented Tuesday at the 234th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The research, led by Ana Bonaca of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, reveals a curious abnormality in an otherwise uniform stream of s

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Observations of Europa by the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that the moon’s ice-covered ocean may hold sodium chloride, or common table salt.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Antibiotic pollution can fuel drug resistance in microbes. A global survey of rivers finds unsafe levels of antibiotics in 16 percent of sites.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

The Large Underground Xenon experiment in South Dakota is one of many projects searching for dark matter and coming up empty. (Credit: LUX Collaboration) Dark matter, the invisible material that so far shows itself only through the pull of its gravity, was first proposed nearly a century ago. It took another half-century to truly ignite the physics community. But at this point, a plethora of highly advanced projects have gone hunting for dark matter and come up empty. Now scientists arou

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


A hoverfly on a cluster of yellow mustard flowers. (Credit: Dave Hansche/Shutterstock) Billions of hoverflies from Europe descend on southern Britain each spring. The black and yellow striped bugs are no more than half an inch in length but make the long trek to Britain for the summer. Once they arrive, the hoverflies pollinate flowers and lay eggs. The fly populations have remained stable unlike those of honeybees and other insects, which have dropped in recent years, researchers find i

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Our Milky Way, shown here in an artist's concept, has strange "ripples" in its outlying regions. New research indicates those ripples were caused by a collision with a dwarf galaxy called Antlia 2. (Credit: ESA) The Milky Way likely collided with a recently discovered dwarf galaxy called Antlia 2 less than a billion years ago, according to new research presented Wednesday at the 234th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society.  The research, spearheaded by Sukanya Chakrabarti of the Ro

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: photo-nic.co.uk nic/Unsplash) By now, you probably know that spending time in nature — hiking through a forest, walking through a park, even hanging out on a beach — is good for your health. There has been many a study on how outside time can lower a person’s risk for developing things like Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and can alleviate symptoms of some mood and mental disorders. Now, researchers have begun to quantify how much time you’d need to spend in nature t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Iris Nebula is captured here by Spitzer. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was launched in 2003 on a mission to spend five years exploring the cosmos in infrared light. That means it excels at capturing images and chemical signatures of warm objects, like the glow of gas in nebulas and galaxies, or the composition of planets in still-forming alien solar systems. It even found a new ring of Saturn. In recent years, it’s been operating with just one instrument,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Ehrman Photographic/Shutterstock) (Inside Science) -- A gangrene-inducing bite in Africa, 40 years of curiosity, and backyard experiments her daughters still complain about have all come together to tell Alison Cobb one thing: Stripes help zebras keep their cool. New research published this week in the Journal of Natural History shows stripes may create air flows that give zebras a kind of natural air conditioning system that helps them ward off the blazing sun. “It’s about therm

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Willrow Hood/Shutterstock) Let's say I have an idea for a great invention one day — a series of pneumatic tubes that would shoot pods with people inside between cities at hundreds of miles an hour. My "Superloop" sounds like a sure-fire hit, but I don't have the resources to pull the project off, and what's more, the technology to build it isn't actually there yet. But I don't want someone with more money to come along and snag the invention from me — I did do the hard work of ha

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Cassini's view of Saturn on January 2, 2010. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute) Since Cassini plunged into Saturn’s atmosphere in 2017, ending its 13-year mission, scientists have continued to comb through the rich store of data it sent back, especially during its last year, when it dove closer to Saturn’s rings than ever before. Among the findings are a deep look at the complex ring system, which hid more structure than scientists expected, including “straw-like” texture

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A Galapagos Finch. (Credit: Ryan M. Bolton/Shutterstock) Nearly 200 years ago Charles Darwin voyaged to the Galapagos islands and began to formulate his theory of evolution -- largely thanks to his observations of how finches' beaks varied in shape from island to island. But now, the finches' famous beaks might be in trouble, thanks to a small, blood-sucking visitor. An invasive insect, called Philornis downsi, is finding a home in the nests of almost every species of ground bird on the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Click on this image, acquired by NASA's Aqua satellite, to watch an animation of sea ice flowing through the Nares Strait from April 19 to May 11, 2019. This flow usually doesn't begin until June or July. (Or click on this link. Source: NASA Worldview via NSIDC) With Arctic temperatures running well above average in May, sea ice in the region continued its long-term decline, finishing with the second lowest extent for the month. And since then, things have gotten worse. On June 10, A

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Learning a little about lice makes for a more efficient battle against the bugs.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/parenting">growth curve/parenting</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/guidelines">growth curve/guidelines</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health-0">growth curve/health</category>

Yesterday’s DDT pollution crisis is still today’s problem in some of Canada’s lakes.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

One of the braziers recovered from the grave site. Some had residues from cannabis smoking in them. (Credit: Xinhua Wu) More than 40 tombs dot the southeastern corner of the Pamir plateau, a desert landscape at nearly 10,000 feet elevation in far western China's high mountains. Buried with the dead is evidence that whoever put them there also conducted rituals at the site more than two millennia ago. And those ceremonies involved a certain hallucinogenic plant we know quite well today: canna

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The United States has finally unveiled its new, highly touted weather prediction model, but some scientists worry that it’s not ready for prime time.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category>

Cannabis may have been altering minds at an ancient high-altitude cemetery, researchers say

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

The scars of Europa’s chaos terrain also includes simple table salt, which could inform scientists about the nature of the moon’s underground ocean. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) Scientists are fairly confident that Jupiter’s moon Europa has an underground ocean, even though they've never seen it. Hidden beneath an icy crust, most of what researchers know about that ocean is based on the moon’s smooth, streaked surface. Europa lacks mountains or large craters, but it is crisscrossed with ri

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In the United States, bats are mostly to blame for rabies deaths, while rabies transmitted by overseas dogs comes in second.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>


Current food packaging often contains films that must be removed before recycling, increasing costs. (Credit: Lunatictm/Shutterstock) Rip open a bag of chips and you’ll find a shiny, silver material staring back at you. This metallized film helps keep packaged foods like cookies and energy bars tasting fresh by preventing gases from leaking out (or in). The material is the industry standard for flexible, shelf-stable food packaging. But it’s not so great for the environment. To recycle th

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A power superflare fries an exoplanet in the star's system. (Credit: NASA, ESA and D. Player) Astronomers have learned over the past decade that even large solar flares — powerful bursts of radiation — from our Sun are actually small potatoes compared to some of the flares we see around other stars. It’s now common to spot “superflares” hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than the Sun’s flares from stars hundreds of light-years away. Earlier this year, researchers even identified a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Two people born with six fingers on each hand can control the extra digit, using it to do tasks better than five-fingered hands, a study finds.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>



Police probably won’t stop searching DNA family trees to find crime suspects. New restrictions on database searches could spur more fights over privacy.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

New views show how fungi shift their stores of phosphorus toward more favorable markets where the nutrient is scarce.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/fungi">life & evolution/fungi</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

In 2016, the United States used millions of kilograms of pesticides that are banned or being phased out in the European Union, Brazil and China.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/agriculture">earth & environment/agriculture</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

In Symphony in C, geophysicist Robert Hazen explores carbon’s ancient origins, its role in life and its importance in the modern world.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cosmology">atom & cosmos/cosmology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>

Counties in states with expanded Medicaid eligibility had 4.3 fewer cardiovascular deaths per 100,000 residents, on average, than if they hadn’t expanded.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

A previously unknown population of Ice Age people who traveled across Beringia was discovered in Russia.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ancestry">humans & society/ancestry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-evolution">humans & society/human evolution</category>

In 1969, scientists proposed building solar panels on the moon to convert the sun’s energy into electricity that can be used on Earth.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/history-science">humans & society/history of science</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

The particles are made of up two smaller particles, stuck together like atoms in a molecule.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

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Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

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Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

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Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

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Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

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When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

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Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

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Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

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Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

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Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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