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For the first time ever, astronomers have observed a magnetic field surrounding and feeding a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. The researchers' observations might shed light on the relationship between black holes and magnetic fields and why some black holes are more active and “hungry” than others. Whereas some supermassive black holes eat everything around them and shoot out high-speed jets, others lie quietly at the center of galaxies, sometimes even dormant. The te

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

As the largest land mammal on the planet, elephants eat a lot of food. On average, the giants consume more than 440 pounds of vegetation per day, or the equivalent of about two corncobs per minute. And now, scientists have figured out how the beasts are able to eat so much so fast. Elephants make joints with their trunks to press down on and scoop up food. Researchers say the discovery could even help engineers build better robots. Elephants are massive, so they need a lot of sustenance.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nothing stirred in the relentless midday heat. The gum trees appeared exhausted, nearly drained of life. The hunters crouched in the foliage, their long, sharp spears poised to unleash at a moment’s notice. The giant birds that were the objects of their attention strode slowly, elegantly, unsuspecting. Most of these creatures were about 7 feet tall. The meat from even one animal offered the tribe sustenance for an extended period of time—but the hunters knew that this reward could come at a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Red dwarfs are small, slowly burning stars that can live for trillions of years before they run out of fuel. And thanks to their generous lifespans, the planets around them (at least those close enough to stay warm) are often considered prime locations for the development of life. However, new research set for publication in The Astrophysical Journal found that red dwarfs tend to be pretty abusive hosts, at least when they’re young. According to the study, infant red dwarfs emit some of

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Black holes are fascinating and cosmically important objects, but because light cannot escape them, they must instead be detected indirectly, such as through their gravitational effects. Discovering black holes this way can be challenging, but researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) in the Canary Islands have just announced a new detection method that might allow astronomers to triple the number of known black holes with masses a few times that of the Sun. The ne

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Icy moon Dione has long, thin, bright lines at its equator that run surprisingly parallel to each other for tens to hundreds of kilometers.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

(Inside Science) — Ecologists call them the living dead: trees that stand across the tropics and beyond, in the midst of transformed landscapes where they can no longer reproduce. They may appear healthy for centuries, but eventually they will fall -- and then their lineage will vanish. One reason for their dire fate: The animals some such trees rely on to disperse their seeds are making fewer and fewer visits. Sean MacDonald is working to call them back -- if not the original seed disper

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Did you know that you can advance scientific research from your home, favorite park, at the beach, at school....anywhere in the world? Scientists need your help to address global and local questions. Citizen Science is Serious Science (and it can be fun). SciStarter will help you get started. Here are some videos to help you learn how to become a citizen scientist.  You'll also find thousands of projects in need of your help on SciStarter! DiscoverMagazine.com posts projects of the week, too,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


In August 2011, a can of Great Value peas joined the nonperishables in my pantry, one of several panic purchases as Hurricane Irene barreled toward my home on the northeast US coast. But the emergency passed, and the can, with its unassuming blue-on-white outline font, remains on my shelf seven years later. Its continued presence raises a dilemma in the form of a clearly legible stamp: “BEST BY 12/31/14.” Should I toss it? Can canned peas go bad? How would I know if they had? Such

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Just below the surface of Mars, scientists suspect that there might be briny waters that, according to a new study, could hold enough molecular oxygen to support certain types of life. As light breaks down carbon dioxide on Mars, a little bit of oxygen is produced. Previously, it has been thought that the minuscule amount of molecular oxygen on Mars could not be enough to support even microscopic life on the Red Planet. However, if there are briny waters just below the planet’s surface, t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Io, Enceladus, Earth — our solar system holds a number of locations where plumes of gas erupt. And for years, scientists have suspected that such plumes also exist on Jupiter’s moon Europa. However, according to one new study done using decades-old data from NASA's Galileo mission, two potential plume sites on the world lack the hot spot signatures that are typically associated with plumes. “We searched through the available Galileo thermal data at the locations proposed as the sites of p

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Typhoons are becoming more destructive at northern latitudes, according to the first long-term study to document how the storms in East Asia are drifting toward the poles. As climate change expands the tropics and warms sea surface temperatures, those conditions are triggering cyclones to form further north, scientists say. That means devastating typhoons will increasingly threaten cities and towns once at the edge of the storms’ influence. “These areas are more sensitive to typhoon impac

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Big Bang, as many cosmologists like to point out, was not very banging. Nothing exploded. But that doesn't mean it wasn't a busy and exciting event. The rush of inflation was a powerful outpouring of energy, which certainly included light. And yet, the energy contained in that early universe was such that light couldn't even escape. For light to be seen, by telescopes or eyes of any species, it needs to be able to travel from its source to the observer. But the universe when it first exi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Elevation matters when it comes to moth size. This selection of geometer (left) and tiger moths (right) from the tropics are arranged according to the elevation they were found at. Researchers from three universities in Germany and the United States measured a lot of moths - more than 19,000, in fact, from 1,100 different species - to figure this out. “Never before has a study been carried out with so many species along a complete elevational gradient - from lowland rainforest to the sum

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Scientists bred a type of weed to lack proteins that help stem the production of bitter chemicals used to ward off insect attacks.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/agriculture">earth & environment/agriculture</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/molecular-evolution">genes & cells/molecular evolution</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

In one Chinese city, costly streetlights could soon be a thing of the past. By 2020, the Tian Fu New Area Science Society plans to launch an artificial moon to light up the night sky. If the plan goes through, the so-called “illumination satellite” would orbit above the Chinese city of Chengdu and glow in conjunction with the actual moon, but shine eight times brighter. The organization says it will launch three more satellites in 2022 — potentially replacing streetlights in urban areas.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Tyrannosaurus rex’s powerful bite and remarkably strong teeth helped the dinosaur crush bones.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

An analysis of portraits believed to portray Leonardo da Vinci offers evidence that the artist had exotropia, in which one eye turns outward.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

New strategies aim to help transplant recipients keep their organs healthy with fewer (or no) immune suppressing drugs.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/immune-science">genes & cells/immune science</category>

Zombees and spiders and bats, Oh MY! Drag your bones over, give these a TRY! Our editors selected these six projects to enchant, haunt, and amaze you this Halloween! Cheers! The SciStarter Team Frankenstein200 Frankenstein200 puts you in the middle of a story where Mary Shelley’s classic tale collides with modern science. Perform experiments, explore hidden areas of research, and assist a pair of young scientists as they unravel a mystery in a cutting-edge digi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

I just came across a strange but quite charming scientific study claiming that human thought alone can make wine taste better. This miracle of vinomancy is reported in a paper in Explore, a unique if often credulity-stretching Elsevier academic journal dedicated to "healing arts, consciousness, spirituality, eco-environmental issues, and basic science as all these fields relate to health." In the article in question, author Stephan A. Schwartz describes how he carried out an experi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Genetic differences are associated with choosing same-sex partners in both men and women.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

Thanks to data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, a team of astronomers has successfully confirmed the Milky Way’s youngest known pulsar. The mission has studied the supernova remnant for over 15 years and has collected invaluable information about its rapid expansion, physical properties, and surrounding environment. This new discovery could provide key information about the death of stars. Pulsing Through Space When a massive star collapses in on itself and explodes in a supernova, i

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Have you heard of the ‘Vampire of Lugano”? Apparently that’s what residents of the Italian commune of Lugano in Teverina are calling this strange archaeological find — the remains of a 10 year old child found in a 5th century cemetery originally thought to be reserved for toddlers and younger. But its not age of death that makes this finding so strange … it’s the stone placed in the skeleton’s mouth. Researchers believe it was intentionally placed as part of a ritual to keep the 10 year o

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Gamma-Ray Sky For countless years, humans have gazed up at the sky and made sense of the stars by finding shapes in them — constellations of heroes, animals, and well-worn tales. Now, to celebrate the 10th mission year of NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, scientists have used the telescope to develop a new set of constellations that correspond with gamma-ray emissions. Gamma rays are the most powerful in the electromagnetic spectrum, and they're typically only produced by very powerf

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In testing, a triple-drug therapy significantly improved lung function in cystic fibrosis patients with the most common disease-causing mutation.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

Blazar Brightness After 10 years of observations, scientists have confirmed a two-year cycle in the gamma-ray brightness of a blazar, or a galaxy with supermassive black holes that consume mass and produce high-energy jets as a result. Blazars are the most energetic and luminous objects that we have identified so far in the known universe. “This is the first time that a gamma-ray period has been confirmed in an active galaxy,” Stefano Ciprini, a researcher at the INFN Tor Vergata division

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Possible traces of lungs preserved with a 120-million-year-old bird fossil could represent a respiratory system similar to that of modern birds.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

Scientists are still learning more about the health effects of chemical sweeteners

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbiology">genes & cells/microbiology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/nutrition">body & brain/nutrition</category>

A new AI that judges whether drugs will interact with certain proteins can train on data from multiple sources while keeping that info secret.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/artificial-intelligence">math & technology/artificial intelligence</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Tornadoes are becoming slightly less frequent in Tornado Alley, while more are touching down farther east in the United States, a study suggests.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category>

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A complex water system magnified flooding’s disruption of the medieval Cambodian city of Angkor.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

A new analysis suggests that tectonics, not microbes, formed cone-shaped structures in 3.7-billion-year-old rock.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbes">life & evolution/microbes</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

Researchers have deciphered the physics underlying dandelion flight.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

The electron remains stubbornly round, meaning we may need to build beyond the Large Hadron Collider to find physics outside of the standard model.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

Readers had questions about a glow at the edge of the solar system, pig lung transplants, the use of the word promiscuous and more.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses how the Science News editors and reporters cover the Nobel Prizes each year.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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