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In the U.S., it's Thanksgiving, which means today is all about the Turkey. So here's a fun fact you may not have heard to chew on as you masticate your meal: you can tell a turkey's sex by it's poop. That's right—male turkeys and female turkeys crap different turds. The toms' feces are long and skinny, while the hens' are coily little clumps. While it might seem strange that males and females would have such different bowel movements, it makes a lot more sense when you consider the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

It isn't aliens. It's never aliens. That's the only sensible answer whenever astronomers spot something truly weird in space. That unusual radio blip from the planet Ross 128b? Not aliens. Potential SETI signal SHGb02+14a? Not aliens. The mysterious 'alien megastructure' star? Probably not aliens, either. There are so many unexplored natural explanations for unusual phenomena, and so many ways to make errors, that the starting assumption has to be no, no, a thousand times no, it is not al

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Cloning didn’t cause the famous sheep to age prematurely.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

By: Daniel McDonald While you kick back and relax after your Thanksgiving dinner,  your gut microbiota – the collection of beneficial microbes, mostly bacteria, that inhabit your lower intestine – will be hard at work breaking down the food you ate and carrying out all kinds of other essential functions.  Research on the microbes that call your intestine home has shown they can affect your brain, treat a hospital-acquired condition called Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), and much more.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Flour, though low in moisture, can sicken people with E. coli toxins if it is eaten raw.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbes">life & evolution/microbes</category>

To breathe or not to breathe, that is the question. What would happen if you were submerged in a pond where the water temperature hovered just above freezing and the surface was capped by a lid of ice for 100 days? Well, obviously you’d die. And that’s because you’re not as cool as a turtle. And by cool I don’t just mean amazing, I mean literally cool, as in cold. Plus, you can’t breathe through your butt. But turtles can, which is just one of the many reasons that turtles are truly

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Whether it’s regulating a burst of anger or calming down a bout of anxiety, taking a deep breath can have a potent effect. There are compelling hints that controlled breathing can improve overall physical wellbeing, but the neurophysiology — the link between our minds and bodies — of controlled breathing hasn’t been very extensively researched. A new study from researchers at Northwestern University and the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine begins to delve into the topic by attempting

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In the skies above Japan, scientists have detected lightning triggering nuclear reactions. These new findings are clear evidence that thunderstorms are a natural source of radioactive isotopes on Earth. Thunderstorms are natural particle accelerators, capable of hurling electrons outward at nearly the speed of light. When these electrons strike atoms, they can generate gamma rays, the highest-energy form of light. Previous research suggested that gamma rays from lightning can have a va

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Ben Kreckx All of us at SciStarter want to thank you for learning about, sharing, or engaging in science. You inspire us. Thank you. Below, you'll find a cornucopia full of Thanksgiving-themed citizen science projects. Gobble 'em up! Cheers! The SciStarter Team American Gut llnl Stuffed yet? Did you know that what you eat affects you

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

On a typically hot and humid July day in Stonetown, the capital of Zanzibar, a gaggle of children, teenagers and the odd parents watched our small drone take flight. My colleagues Makame Makame, Khamis Haji and I had finally found the perfect launch spot. With a high-pitched humming, the drone took to the air. It sounded like a big mosquito—appropriate, since we were testing the use of drones for mapping aquatic malaria habitats. These shallow sunlit water bodies teem with mosquito larvae

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Eating small amounts of a neonicotinoid pesticide can disorient white-crowned sparrows.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

Two days before plunging into Saturn, Cassini took a mosaic image of the gas giant, its rings and its moons.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/editors-picks/cassini-mission-saturn">cassini mission to saturn</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Roughly one in five cancer patients struggle with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath of diagnosis and treatment. A recent study from Malaysia indicates that PTSD is a fairly common result of the long and difficult process of living with and treating cancer. Though most commonly associated with soldiers returning from war, PTSD can result from many different forms of trauma. The disorder can sometimes go unnoticed, or be misdiagnosed, causing those suffering to endure p

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The cloud formations in the photograph above, and those to follow, may look otherworldly, and maybe even a bit ominous. But they are perfectly benign (except when they herald an approaching storm), and are well known to meteorologists. The scientific name for these cloud formations is "altocumulus standing lenticularus.' But from here on out, I'll just refer to them lenticular clouds. If you've never seen lenticular clouds like these before, whether in pictures or in person, you might

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

As the opioid epidemic rages in the U.S., the number of overdose deaths has nearly quadrupled since 1999. And according to a new study, baby boomers and millennials are at significantly higher risk. Researchers from Columbia University analyzed drug overdose deaths in the United States between 1999-2014, the most recent year for which data was available. (The team selected 1999 as the start date due to changes in drug classification that would have made reconciling pre- and post-1999 da

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Researchers call it "stink flirting." A male ring-tailed lemur rubs his signature scent onto his long, fluffy tail, then waves it over his head in the direction of a nearby female. Males seem to intend this gesture as a sexual overture. But it often gets them into fights—with lemurs of both sexes. In fact, scientists aren't sure stink flirting helps male lemurs at all. Smell is an important communication tool for ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Both males and females have scent glan

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Even as unmonitored self-driving cars take to the streets, there’s no consensus about how safe is “safe enough” for driverless vehicles.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public">science & the public</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

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Tests answer some questions about the emerald ash borer’s hidden taste for olive and fringe trees.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

After weeks of unrest that has waxed and waned, Agung in Indonesia finally produced an explosive eruption today. This blast wasn't anything close to the large blast that some media organizations have been claiming, but rather a relatively small eruption (see below) that was driven by water flashing to steam at the summit crater. pic.twitter.com/gJYqXhdaA9 — Ali (@Ali_Di_Bali) November 21, 2017 Drone footage (below) taken not long after this explosive eruption shows the steaming crater.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For being an island in the North Atlantic, Iceland has a lot of volcanoes. Some of them generate a lot of anxiety when they have the inevitable rumbles. An earthquake swarm at Katla or Hekla causes all sorts of media alarms to go off, which is surprising considering the last three eruptions in Iceland came from Barðarbunga (well, the Holuhraun field, in 2014-15), Grímsvötn (in 2011) and Eyjafjallajökull (in 2010). There is plenty of volcanic unrest in Iceland to spread around in this geol

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Just a small amount of crude can make birds less active.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

The NOAA-20 satellite was to be the first of four, but the Trump Administration has sought to delay and massively cut the program In the early morning hours of Saturday, Nov. 18th, a Delta  II rocket roared to life and propelled the newest U.S. weather satellite into orbit on a column of fire that lit up the nighttime sky of coastal California. The NOAA-20 satellite is now circling the globe 14 times a day, orbiting from pole to pole at about 520 miles above the surface. It is equipped w

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Young babies know a cup of juice from a car, but have a hard time distinguishing more similar nouns, a new study finds.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/parenting">growth curve/parenting</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/child-development">growth curve/child development</category>

Scientists now have an idea of what the first recorded extra-solar asteroid looked like. The hunk of rock of that whipped through the solar system in October looks like no other asteroid we've seen before, they say, long and thin like a javelin and colored red from millions of years of accumulated radiation exposure. The coloration wasn't surprising, but the shape was, say astronomers from the European Southern Observatory. Most objects astronomers observe in our solar system are roughly

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new metamaterial has a seemingly impossible property: It swells when squeezed.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/materials">matter & energy/materials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Swirls of sand, sea salt and smoke make atmospheric currents visible in a new NASA visualization.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

"Beneath Our Feet" puts maps on display to show how people have envisioned and explored Earth’s subsurface.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/history-science">humans & society/history of science</category>

The iconic Arecibo radio telescope has survived Hurricane Maria and dodged deep funding cuts.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>


Caterpillars that feast on plastic have different gut microbes than those that eat a grain-based diet.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

Diseased corals fluoresce less than healthy corals, and a new analysis technique can help spot the reduced glow.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Self-limiting genetic tools already in development may be able to get around concerns surrounding the use of gene drives.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>


LIGO spots another merger, this time with less fanfare.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/editors-picks/gravitational-waves">gravitational waves</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Artificial limbs have come a long way since 1967.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>


Mental illness knows no borders. One relentless Indian psychiatrist pushes to make treatment a standard around the world.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

11/10/2017
A toxic fungus infects crops eaten across the developing world. Scientists are engineering a solution.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The cute-but-dangerous creatures don’t actually hibernate, don’t gobble honey as much as people think and have a sketchy family tree.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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