Science News RSS Feed

Science News

Get the latest scientific news and information on new discoveries.
Feed created by csharpfrog
138

Paint a room in light colors to make it look bigger. Wear black to look slimmer. These are well known facts about how color influences our perception—but it's not all black and white. New research from Boston College is showing that color saturation — how pure a color is — affects how we perceive an objects' size. The more saturated a color is, the bigger something looks, the researchers say, with attendant implications for marketing and design. More than that, however, their findings als

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A self-selected sample of 202 deceased football players, the largest to date, finds that the majority suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/mental-health">body & brain/mental health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

Flying cars are up against a wall — literally. Turning aircraft into street-safe machines requires manufacturers to prove their safety standards in crash tests. So at least one expensive prototype needs to get smashed to smithereens, while its dummy passengers survive. This is no small financial hurdle, and for a decade the industry has been just a few years away from getting models street-certified. Flying Cars, or Driveable Planes? Farthest along, perhaps, are the MIT-graduate founders o

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Certain bacteria found on the penis raise the risk of HIV infection, a new study finds.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>


Neuroscientists offer multiple “perspectives” on how to plug gaps in current knowledge of the brain’s inner workings.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/context">context</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

While you're writing down yet another password on the notepad hidden in your desk drawer, a squirrel is retrieving nuts it buried months earlier. It's no secret these animals have good memories. But they don't only remember where they stuck stuff: squirrels can remember how to solve a puzzle almost two years after they last saw it. And they can use that knowledge to tackle a problem they haven't seen before. In a lab at the University of Exeter, Pizza Ka Yee Chow studies gray squirrels. S

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For decades, astronomer Jill Tarter led the hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence, as detailed in a new biography.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/history-science">humans & society/history of science</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

A Wisconsin company will be the first in the United States to implant microchips beneath the skin of its employees. Three Squared Market (32M), a break-room kiosk company, has offered to give its workers subdermal RFID tags, tiny rice-grain-sized pellets that can hold information like credit card numbers and passwords. With their "handy" chips, they'll be able to unlock doors, log in to computers, and, of course, buy snacks from the company vending machines—all with a wave of their hand.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Not all stars are good parents to their budding planets — some get downright nasty and kick their children into interstellar space. We’ve found a handful of these free orphaned planets before, and they're called “rogue planets.” But a study today in Nature Astronomy suggests that the type we’ve seen so far, which are all gas giant sized, are the exception, not the norm. “Basically, it is much easier to eject an Earth-mass planet than a Jupiter-mass planet,” Przemek Mróz, lead author of

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Jupiter-mass planets without parent solar systems are less common than astronomers thought, a new study suggests.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/exoplanets">atom & cosmos/exoplanets</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

A new method of nuclear forensics could make it harder to handle radioactive material in secret.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

The changing Arctic revealed through key scientific outposts and technologies.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A heart attack or diabetic blackout can have especially deadly consequences for drivers when they cause car crashes. Toyota researchers hope to change that grim equation by studying how wearable devices could help smart cars possibly save lives by predicting medical emergencies ahead of time. The day when smart cars—either manually driven or self-driven—will watch out for the health of their drivers remains some ways off into the future. But Toyota's Collaborative Safety Research Center t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Advertisement

For an accessible account of mostly pre-20th century science, check out The Oxford Illustrated History of Science.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/history-science">humans & society/history of science</category>

Actually, it's a sunspot group, and the active region it is tied to let loose an aurora-causing eruption of hot plasma I guess I just can't get enough of time-lapse animations. A couple of days ago, I was mesmerized by an animation of satellite images showing not just smoke billowing from a California wildfire but also the blaze itself. And yesterday, I was smitten by an animation showing the tiny Martian moon Phobos zinging around the Red Planet. SEE ALSO: This is just really cool –

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A number of so-called scientific journals have accepted a Star Wars-themed spoof paper. The manuscript is an absurd mess of factual errors, plagiarism and movie quotes. I know because I wrote it. Inspired by previous publishing "stings", I wanted to test whether 'predatory' journals would publish an obviously absurd paper. So I created a spoof manuscript about "midi-chlorians" - the fictional entities which live inside cells and give Jedi their powers in Star Wars. I filled it with other refe

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

On May 12, 2016, when Mars was 50 million miles from Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope turned its incredibly sharp eye toward the Red Planet. The time-lapse animation above reveals what it saw. That little white speck zinging around Mars is Phobos, a football-shaped moon just 16.5 miles by 13.5 miles by 11 miles. You're seeing it in an animation consisting of 13 separate exposures by Hubble. Phobos looks like it is speeding along at an unbelievably rapid clip. In reality, Hubble acquir

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new soft robot grows like a creeping vine to weave its way around obstacles and nose into tiny spaces. From researchers at Stanford University, the robot consists mostly of an inflatable tube that's been folded in on itself and coiled up. To move, a pneumatic pump fills the tube with air, pushing it forward by drawing material from the inside. In initial tests, the robot stretched as far as 72 meters from an initial length of 28 centimeters and reached speeds of over 20 mph. Grow Robot

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Fire ants use the same set of simple rules to produce static rafts and perpetually moving towers.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things">wild things</category>

The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting. The mud volcano known as Lusi started on May 29, 2006, and at its peak disgorged a staggering 180,000 cubic meters of mud every day, burying villages in mud up to 40 meters thick. The worst event of its kind in recorded history, the eruption took 13 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 people. But although

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

With its vastly improved capabilities, the new satellite has the potential to save the lives of firefighters For decades, satellites have been helping fire managers identify and monitor blazes, based on their smoke plumes and the hot spots they create in infrared imagery. But as the animation above shows in spectacular fashion, the new GOES-16 weather satellite has taken things to a new level. With higher resolution imagery, and nearly real-time imaging capabilities, it is already helpin

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Sink your teeth into these projects! The Discovery Channel kicks off Shark Week in three days, when we'll will find out if Michael Phelps is faster than a shark! Not quite up for racing a shark yourself? You can still celebrate Shark Week by getting involved in one of the many citizen science projects that study and protect sharks. Below, we've highlighted five projects we think you'll love. In some cases, you can even participate from the comfort of home. Find more

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Newly proposed space objects called synestias are large, spinning hunks of mostly vaporized rock. They look like a jelly-filled doughnut.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Sharks are pretty incredible animals. They've lived on this planet for more than 400 million years, and in that time, come to dominate the oceans they inhabit. That kind of survival when so many other lineages have gone extinct requires serious resilience. Now, a lemon shark off Florida has shown off just how tough these animals can be: he survived for at least 435 days with a hole in his body created as he shoved a swallowed fishing implement out of him through his flesh. The shark was f

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

You might think that after centuries of breeding, racehorses have reached their peak speeds. And previous studies supported that. But not this one! According to this study, which used "a much larger dataset covering the full range of race distances and accounting for variation in factors such as ground softness," racehorses have gotten faster over the past 150 years or so, an improvement evident even in the past 15 years. Holy Secretariat! Racehorses are getting faster. "Previous studi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Babies allowed to feed themselves gained similar amounts of weight as babies spoon-fed by caretakers.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/child-development">growth curve/child development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health-0">growth curve/health</category>

We exist in a veritable flood of digital images, with at least 350 million a day uploaded to Facebook alone, and odds are significant number of those images are fake. And, given results from a recent study, most people can't tell the difference. Can you identify the part of the top photo that's been altered? Don't worry, we'll tell you later. Psychologist Sophie Nightingale and her colleagues at the University of Warwick used photo-editing software to doctor real-world photos in ways t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

New tools for pest and disease control could become useless without improvements.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Scientists found evidence of a particle that is its own antiparticle.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/condensed-matter">matter & energy/condensed matter</category>

Almost every child, shovel in hand, is struck by a tempting thought. What if I just kept digging and popped out on the other side of the world? The imagination conjures a muddy face emerging in the middle of a Shaolin temple or some such, China being the nominal "other side of the world" to Americans. That image is wrong, unfortunately, as a map showing the Earthly antipodes makes clear. Antipodes on a sphere are the pair of points furthest away from each other, and on Earth, most of them

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For the first time in any animal, researchers elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV. Cows’ antibodies could help with drug development.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/immune-science">genes & cells/immune science</category>

The distinct sputtering-lawnmower sound of a male elephant seal’s call has a tempo that broadcasts his identity to competitors.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

The team behind the spacecraft that visited Pluto has seen its next quarry blocking the light from a distant star.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

A new soft robot navigates its environment by growing in a manner inspired by plants.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/robotics">math & technology/robotics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

Dog domestication may be the result of just a few genetic changes, including ones that made canines more interested in interacting with people.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

Australia may have said “G’day” to humankind thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category>

Tiniest transistor, made with carbon nanotubes, suggests computers aren’t done shrinking down.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/computing">math & technology/computing</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>



Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

RSS Feed Subscribe to this Feed via RSS reader.

Related Feeds
Coloring Pages      Music News      Cognitive Science      Gadgets      Country Music News      Astronomy News     

Advertisement