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Exercise is good for us in a lot of ways. It helps cut the pounds, increases cardiovascular health, adds muscle mass and can boost our mood. What it also does, though, is help keep our bones strong. Studies have shown that regular exercise, especially involving weights, ups bone mass and maintains the health of our skeletal system. For us spring chickens, having strong bones might not sound all that critical, as our skeleton seems to get by just fine no matter what we do. But in the elder

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Supernovae are the explosive end stages of massive stars. About 2.6 million years ago, one such supernova lit up Earth’s sky from about 150 light-years away. A few hundred years later, after the new star had long since faded from the sky, cosmic rays from the event finally reached Earth, slamming into our planet. Now, a group of researchers led by Adrian Melott at the University of Kansas believes this cosmic onslaught is linked to a mass extinction of ocean animals roaming Earth’s waters at

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Monitoring the well-being of Antarctica’s delicate ecosystem just got a little bit easier thanks to a very unlikely source: penguin poop. By analyzing over 40 years of Antarctic images gathered by seven satellites as part of the Landsat program, a NASA-funded team of researchers recently uncovered new details about the lives of Antarctica's Adélie penguins — a species that may help reveal past and future threats to one of the most unspoiled regions in the world. In research p

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In Mexico, corn tortillas rule the kitchen. After all, maize began evolving there from a grass called teosinte some 9,000 years ago, eventually becoming a staple consumed around the world. But that spread presents a puzzle. In 5,300-year-old remains of maize from Mexico, genes from the wild relative show that the plant was still only partly domesticated. Yet archaeological evidence shows that a fully domesticated variety was being grown in South America more than 1,000 years before that.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The first wave of data from the PsychENCODE project holds new clues to how and when psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia emerge.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

A medical procedure transferred a key component of Alzheimer’s disease from one person to another, finds a new study published today in the journal Nature. The discovery suggests the seeds of the devastating neurodegenerative disease are transmissible. “It is a new way of thinking about the condition,” John Collinge, a neurologist at the University of College London in the United Kingdom, who led the new research, told reporters during a media briefing. Odd Autopsy Three years ago, Coll

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Launching Virgin Galactic Virgin Galactic has followed through with their ambitious goal to launch their SpaceShipTwo vehicle into space before Christmas. Today, the aerospace company successfully launched four NASA-supported technologies and two brave test pilots aboard the suborbital space plane into space and then landed safely back on Earth. [embed]https://twitter.com/virgingalactic/status/1073246723114381312[/embed] Today, SpaceShipTwo, named the VSS Unity, launched for space,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The idea of shrinking things down to a more convenient size seems so enticing. It’s a superpower for Ant-Man, kicks off the adventures in Honey I Shrunk the Kids, and, of course, the Simpsons had fun with the idea too. (Shrinkage has come up in other contexts, as well.) Now, in real life, a team of MIT and Harvard scientists has gotten in on the fun by devising a new way of constructing nanomaterials — tiny machines or structures on the order of just a billionth of a meter. They call it I

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A DNA study challenges the idea people fully tamed maize in Mexico before the plant spread.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

Amyloid-beta found in vials of growth hormone can move from brain to brain, a mouse study shows.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

By slamming small particles into heavy gold nuclei at nearly the speed of light, scientists have created tiny, ultra-hot droplets of a bizarre type of matter called a quark-gluon plasma (QGP), which once filled the entire universe shortly after the Big Bang. Creating such a 'quark soup' is a tough task in its own right; the first sample of QGP was produced less than two decades ago by smashing two heavy atoms together. But for this new study, which was carried out as part of the PHE

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nine-banded armadillos have identical quadruplets. But the youngsters aren’t identical enough, and scientists 50 years ago could not figure out why.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe survived its first encounter with the sun and is sending data back to Earth.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

New research has created self-cloning hybrid rice, raising hopes of higher food production.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

Ah, adolescence. A time of change, of navigating awkward social situations, figuring out who you are, maybe holding down that first job or focusing on extracurriculars — all while juggling the demands of school. And for most teens, managing all of this happens on too little sleep. To help alleviate the lack of Z’s, experts in the U.S. have been pushing for school systems across the country to roll back the start times for middle and high school students. Now, a new paper in the journal Sc

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Inside Science) -- Just a few weeks ago, two large wildfires caused massive destruction and at least 91 deaths in California, the Woolsey fire near Los Angeles and the Camp fire that engulfed the town of Paradise in the north. Residents and firefighters struggled to stop both fires, yet they can expect more like them to come. Simultaneous large fires are becoming more common throughout the continental United States, according to new research presented by Alison Cullen today at the Societ

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Infants born dependent on opioids had heads that were smaller than babies whose moms didn’t use the drugs during pregnancy.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category>

You probably didn’t notice but the last time you talked with a colleague or chatted with a friend, you blinked. A lot. Blinks are a conversational cue akin to nodding one's head, according to a new study published today in the journal PLOS One. As such, the unconscious reflex changes how people talk to each other. Even the subtlest non-verbal clues impact our conversations, the finding suggests. “Our findings indicate that even visually subtle behavior such as listener blinking is anyt

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Multiple recently discovered specimens of Thylacoleo carnifex have allowed researchers to reconstruct the extinct animal's entire skeleton for the first time, revising what we know about how Australia's largest-ever carnivorous mammal moved. Spoiler alert: It appears that, despite weighing in excess of 200 pounds, the animal was an adept climber. Add that skill to the list of traits, including unique flesh-shearing teeth and a lethal thumb claw, that make Thylacoleo so fascinating. Nickna

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Virgin Galactic, one of the companies aiming to become the first to send astronauts into space, is planning to put its SpaceShipTwo vehicle through its next phase of testing starting as early as Thursday, December 13. It will be the fourth powered flight for the vehicle, named VSS Unity, and the first since its successful July 26 flight, which reached a peak altitude of 32 miles (52 kilometers). Now, the company is aiming higher, further, and faster — this next round of tests will “[expan

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Seagrass meadows cover an area roughly the size of Switzerland in the deep waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon. Now, a new study shows the coastal ecosystems store significant amounts of carbon. The finding suggests deep water seagrass meadows could help mitigate climate change. “If we are to help regain control of our planet’s thermostat and limit global warming, we must capitalize on the powerful ability of natural ecosystems to sequester and store carbon,” Peter Macreadie, a marine

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The 2018 eruption at Kīlauea was the largest in the United States since 1980. Between 0.8 and one cubic kilometers of lava poured out onto the surface of the Big Island of Hawai'i over the course of a few months, leading to massive destruction of property and infrastructure, but happily no loss of life. Much of that can be pinned on the excellent work done by the US Geological Survey and the Emergency Management teams in Hawai'i. Although it has only been a few months since the eruption c

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Ready, set…CHOMP! With mandibles that snap at up to 200mph (90 meters per second) Mystrium camillae, otherwise known as a Dracula ant, now holds the new speed record for fastest known animal appendage, beating out the trap-jaw ant’s impressive 140mph bite. University of Illinois animal biology and entomology professor Andrew Suarez led the study that uncovered the new record, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. High-speed video was used to record the mandibles in action,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new survey suggests that lots and lots of babies aren’t sleeping through the night. The results may prompt new parents to lower their expectations.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/parenting">growth curve/parenting</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/child-development">growth curve/child development</category>

Long-awaited analyses of the Little Foot skeleton have researchers disagreeing over resurrecting a defunct species name.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-evolution">humans & society/human evolution</category>

There are more coral species lurking in the deep ocean that previously thought. That could be good news for their shallow water counterparts.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category>

Imagine an archaeological dig far in the future. Scientists are excavating a site somewhere in what was once North America, peeling back layers of dirt in search of the remnants of a vanished civilization. Millions of years having passed, there's not much left, and the archaeologists must be diligent. But, as they scrape and sift, clues to this vanished people emerge, a peephole into a bygone culture. What objects would these future archaeologists find? What specimens would they dust off,

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

On Tuesday, two Russian cosmonauts spent seven hours and 45 minutes on a spacewalk, working to solve the mystery of who or what poked a hole in the Soyuz spacecraft. The cosmonauts used knives and other tools to cut a 10-inch chunk out of the International Space Station. It will be brought back to Earth and investigated for clues to the cause of a small hole in the Soyuz capsule. Back in August, astronauts noticed a slight drop in pressure on the International Space Station. While not an

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

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Organics on Ceres Data from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft show that there is an abundance of carbon on Ceres. Dawn ended its mission on November 1, 2018. However, the spacecraft has remained in orbit around Ceres 257 million miles from Earth. Propelled by an ion engine, the craft was the first to ever visit a dwarf planet. And, in its orbit around Ceres, Dawn has now collected data that provides evidence of organic matter on the planet's surface. In a new study detailing these findings, a team

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The dark, high-pressure depths of Earth's interior is an unexpected place to find life. Now, an international group of scientists report there’s 16.5 to 25 billion tons of micro-organisms beneath the planet's surface. The team’s work is redefining what a habitable environment is. The discoveries “force us to reimagine what the boundaries are that life can exist in,” said Karen Lloyd, a microbiologist at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Deep Discovery Lloyd is a member of the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


A new device that harnesses sunlight to produce pure vapor from seawater could last longer and produce cleaner water than other technology.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/sustainability">earth & environment/sustainability</category>

The tally of extreme weather events linked to climate change continues to grow, with new studies outlining links to more than a dozen events in 2017.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category>

The same nerves and muscles that create goose bumps may make hair grow.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category>

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft found signs of water and lots of boulders on the asteroid Bennu.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Voyager 2 just became the second probe ever to enter interstellar space, and the first with a working plasma instrument.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cosmology">atom & cosmos/cosmology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>


Science News writers and editors pick which science books were this year’s must-reads.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/editors-picks/favorite-books-2018">favorite books of 2018</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Scientists can dial the stiffness of a bizarre new type of synthetic material up or down using magnets.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/materials">matter & energy/materials</category>

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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