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Scientists confirm that Uranus' atmosphere contains hydrogen sulfide, a compound long suspected to be swirling about in the planet's clouds. Using the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, researchers from the United Kingdom analyzed Uranus using a technique known as spectroscopy to identify the elements contained within. They relied on the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) at Gemini for the task, which involves breaking down the light reflected from Uranus by wavelength to det

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

How do you get inside a whale's head? With a CT-scanner made for rocket bodies, that's how. Researchers from San Diego State University stuck an entire juvenile minke whale inside a computed tomography (CT) scanning machine to virtually slice and dice its anatomy with X-rays. Their goal was to get a look at the structures that allow whales to hear underwater and better understand a sense that's vital for these underwater mammals. Ears Over Eyes In the ocean, sight can only get you so fa

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Click on an article about space on Discover, and you’ll likely run into a measurement in terms of light-years, solar masses, astronomical units, or arcminutes. These units are unique to astronomy, and all can be expressed in terms of other, more fundamental units, such as meters, grams, and degrees. In a paper published April 1 in Astronomy & Geophysics, Keith Atkin, a retired associate lecturer in physics at the University of Sheffield, UK, argues that while the professional

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A survey of hundreds of star systems precisely links the shape of a galaxy to the ages of its stars.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

Planetary scientists detected hydrogen sulfide in Uranus’ upper clouds — the same compound that gives rotten eggs their terrible smell.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Narrative reviews of medical evidence offer benefits that the supposedly superior systematic approach can’t.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/context">context</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Earth Day Network, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and U.S. Department of State, Announces Earth Challenge 2020 — A Citizen Science Initiative. In anticipation of the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day in 2020, Earth Day Network, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the U.S. Department of State, through the Eco-Capitals Forum, announce Earth Challenge 2020, a Citizen Science Initiative. This initiative is in collaboration with Connec

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new paper from MIT neuroscientists Sharon Gilad-Gutnick and colleagues reveals that we are remarkably good at recognizing faces even if they are highly distorted. Not only is this scientifically interesting, the deformed images used in this study are rather hilarious. Here's an example of a face being distorted by horizontal and vertical compression (also known as thinning and flattening). The unfortunate victim of these distortions is Bill Clinton: Gilad-Gutnick et al. found tha

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

If you’ve ever looked at a schematic for an Apollo flight like the one on the left, you’ll notice right away that it traces out a figure 8, which leads many to wonder why? Surely it's easier to go in a straight line, right? Turns out, it was the safest way to travel. There are a few things at play here that come together to make it a figure 8, so let's start with a quick video explainer that has some visuals that will help. And then we can jump into the mission in more detail starting from a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Gabon's hottest nightclub is Sirdavidia solannona. Located on the side of a mountain in this coastal African country, the genus of flowering plants has pulled out all stops. It's got everything: stamens, anthers, petals, stems, bees, three drunk porpoises trying to microwave leftover Chipotle, a human Slap Chop... You know — it's that thing of where... OK, OK, I can't keep that going, there's a reason I'm here and not on SNL. Some bits get away from you, what can I say! Anyway

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Ants, social insects that live in structured communities and work around the clock to keep the colony running, really take one for the team. Elderly and terminally ill ants leave their nests to die, while others purposefully explode. Scientists recently discovered a new species of exploding ants, which kill themselves to save their colony as a defensive behavior. Worker ants can choose to rupture their abdominal wall to ward off or kill enemies. During the fatal act, called autothysis, th

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A new genetic study suggests that cicadas that emerge every 17 years have swapped genetic material with those that emerge every 13 years.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Kilauea! What's not to love? The Hawaiian volcano has been constantly erupting over over 37 years and has not one but two active lava lakes. Lava flows are regular features on the volcano's broad slopes and every once in a while, the summit lava lake has a small explosion when pieces of the walls fall into the fiery pit. Not only that, but you can watch it all happening! The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has webcams watching many points of interest on Kilauea -- both regular webcams a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In some STEM fields, the gender gap won’t disappear for decades or even centuries, a new study suggests.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

The latest research on coral reefs clarifies the devastation of heat waves and looks at how coral might be able to adapt to warming waters.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>

Big news this week as Hans Asperger, autism pioneer and namesake of Asperger's syndrome, is accused of having collaborated in the murder of children during the Nazi rule in Austria. The accusations come in the form of a long paper by historian Herwig Czech in the journal Molecular Autism. Czech presents an analysis of Asperger's activities as head of the Heilpädagogik Ward of the Pediatric Clinic at the University of Vienna, from 1935 to 1943. Here, Asperger was responsible for the evalua

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

If you’re a cat owner, then you probably have a pretty good sense of whether your cat is happy, angry, or frustrated. But do cats, like humans, actually have common “facial expressions” that accompany these emotions? People have actually been studying questions like this for decades (and even back to Charles Darwin), but not always in a scientifically rigorous manner. Enter these scientists, who set out to create a “facial coding system” for cats, which they term “CatFACS” (fortunately not r

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Pluto’s largest moon, Charon, now has 12 new names for its topological features.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category>

Throughout history we’ve blushed and called it la petite mort, the sting of pleasure, the balsamic injection, the flood of bliss—the list continues. But let’s cut to the chase: I’m talking about ejaculation. It’s almost seems as if some deep-seated Puritanical modesty compels us to semantically sidestep addressing this perfectly natural function. Perhaps we’re just a bit bashful that it feels really, really good. It’s not polite to discuss such scrumptious pleasures publicly. Humans ar

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

When we think of the organs that help humans stay alive under the water, the heart and lungs top the list. But there's another organ that deserves recognition as well, though few of us would think to name it. It's the spleen. Mammals have a unique response to having our faces engulfed by water. Our heart rate slows and peripheral blood vessels constrict, shunting blood to vital organs where it's needed most. At the same time, our spleens release a cache of red blood vessels held for this

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Bajau people of Southeast Asia have a gene variant associated with larger spleens, boosting their oxygen while breath-hold diving, researchers say.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physiology">genes & cells/physiology</category>

When you hear the word “nature,” you’re likely to think of your last camping trip to a state park, or of grandiose landscapes with forests, lakes, and snow-capped mountains. You may remember the last trip to the beach and the variety of birds you saw while sunbathing. There are likely many images that pop into your head when you hear the word but the image of a city is likely not one of them. The City Nature Challenge hopes to change that. What is the City Nature Challenge and how did it star

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Diamond is the hardest natural material, but now scientists have shown that it can bend and stretch, much like rubber, and even elastically snap back into shape — even if it only happens with diamonds that are very small. Such flexibility could open up a wide new range of applications for diamond, the researchers say. Diamond is extraordinarily hard, meaning it excels at resisting any change to its shape — that’s why a diamond can cut through softer materials and will only be scratched by

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A 20-year experiment spots a reversal in the way two kinds of plants take up extra carbon from the atmosphere.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecosystems">earth & environment/ecosystems</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

Red light exposure made some genetically engineered fruit flies ejaculate, spurring a surge of a brain reward compound — and less desire for booze.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

The average cow needs cranial surgery like it needs a hole in the head, but for one ancient bovine, it appears that's exactly what the doctor ordered. Researchers describing a hole in the skull of a Neolithic cow say it's possibly the earliest example of veterinary surgery — though it may have also been mere practice for performing the procedure on a human patient. Trepanation, or the act of intentionally making a hole in the skull, has a long history in our species (and it's still o

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Scientists tweaked a bacterial enzyme and made it more efficient in breaking down plastics found in polyester and plastic bottles.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbes">life & evolution/microbes</category>

The 'shark' will soon gobble up La Niña's cool surface waters. What might this mean for the climate later this year? It's not every day that you see an animated graphic like the one above hosted on the website of an ordinarily staid U.S. government agency. And yes, that is indeed an illustration comparing a complex Earth system phenomenon to, well, a shark. The comparison comes from the fabulous folks at the ENSO Blog, published under the aegis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

After reaching its orbit in about two months, the telescope will start scanning nearby stars telltale dips in light that signal a passing planet.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/exoplanets">atom & cosmos/exoplanets</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Almost two miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean, on a lonely outcrop of bare rock 100 miles from Costa Rica, researchers on a geological expedition found something odd. As their remotely controlled submersible sunk through the black waters toward the seafloor, they saw a collection of purple lumps dotting the rocky bottom. As they got closer, they resolved themselves into something resembling a bowling ball with suckers. It was a group of female octopuses, of the genus Muusoctopus

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

It's intuitive: We hear a message, think about it, and decide whether or not we believe it. We have to do it whenever we get a new piece of information in our lives, from politics to the news to gossip, so you’d think we’d be good at it by now. But studies constantly show that our squishy human brains don’t make it quite so easy. Presenting information in different ways — whether there’s a photo included, or changing the colors of the words — affects our interpretation of it, without our

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Earth has been taking a very slight breather this year from the seemingly unrelenting record-setting global temperatures observed in the previous two years. And this past month was no exception. By NASA's accounting, March 2018 was the sixth warmest such month in records dating back to 1880. In an independent analysis, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration pegged March as fifth warmest. And for the first quarter of the year (January through March), NOAA shows the period as s

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Ravens pecking at frosty pipes caused a glitch in gravitational wave data.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category>

Bits of metal nestled inside diamonds suggest the space rock could have formed in a Mars-sized protoplanet in the early solar system.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Touch sensation in VR can go from immersive to unnerving as the feeling gets more realistic, if you can’t see the source.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Hoards of migrating shrimp and krill can cause large-scale turbulence in the ocean, a new study suggests.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category>

Clawed pawlike forelimbs help true seals hunt like their land-dwelling ancestors.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>


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Expanding missile defense capabilities could put the world on a slippery slope to space warfare.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/physics">matter & energy/physics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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