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Backyard Worlds: Planet 9, a citizen science project, lets space enthusiasts search for undiscovered objects in the sky, including a hypothesized planet at the far reaches of the solar system.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Good looking, sociable people don't make good scientists, according to popular stereotypes. This is one of the findings of an interesting new study of how scientists are perceived, from British researchers Ana I. Gheorghiu and colleagues. Gheorghiu et al. took 616 pictures of scientists, which they downloaded from the faculty pages at various universities. They gave the portraits to two sets of raters. The first group were asked to rate the attractiveness of the portraits and to say whet

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Administration would cut total federal research spending by about 17 percent, according to a preliminary estimate.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public">science & the public</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Can behaviors really be contagious? Runners log more miles when their friends do — especially if they want to stay leader of the pack, a new study finds.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/scicurious">scicurious</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/psychology">humans & society/psychology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Eating your own placenta: some people (many of them celebrities) claim that it is a miracle cure-all, helping a new mother overcome everything from postpartum depression to low milk production. But is there actually any proof to these claims? Not that pro-placentophagers (we just made that word up) will likely care, but according to this meta-analysis of the literature, there is little scientific proof for any of these health claims. More specifically, the authors conclude that "studies inve

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Simulations of HAT-P 7b’s magnetic field give clues to why the exoplanet’s winds blow both east and west.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/exoplanets">atom & cosmos/exoplanets</category>

The first results from Juno's brush with Jupiter reveal swarms of cyclones, massive ammonia plumes and complex interactions between a turbulent magnetic field and powerful streams of electrons. The findings are published today in Science and Geophysical Research Letters. The Juno team is still sifting through the massive piles of data the probe is sending back from the gas giant. Since arriving last year, the probe has begun to study the composition and internal structure of Jupiter. We’r

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has sent back unexpected details about Jupiter, giving scientists their first intimate look at the giant planet.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/editors-picks/juno-mission-jupiter">juno mission to jupiter</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

The 2004 Indonesian quake was surprisingly strong because of dried-out, brittle minerals far below.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/oceans">earth & environment/oceans</category>

Nerve cells in a little-studied part of the brain exert a powerful effect on eating, a mouse study suggests.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

Scientists are the subject of many stereotypes, from the mad scientist to the goofy nerd. What these all have in common, of course, is that they are generally not very attractive. So it's probably not too surprising that this study found that people judge the quality of a scientist's research by his/her facial appearance. More specifically, when it comes to science communication, "Apparent competence and morality were positively related to both interest and quality judgments, whereas attractiven

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Blood test that detects five tumor proteins may someday help doctors better screen for pancreatic cancer.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cancer">body & brain/cancer</category>

Cowpea seed beetle sex is complicated. During copulation, the male seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus, uses his sharp, spiky penis to damage females’ reproductive tract while depositing sperm. All the while, the female vigorously kicks at her suitor—it hurts! As studies have shown, males with longer, harmful penis spikes enjoy more reproductive success, to the detriment of their partner’s health. But the process of evolution has a way of balancing the scales. In a new study, Liam Do

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Just nine years after its official opening, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway is undergoing renovations to protect it from climate change. The work was prompted by accidental flooding that took place last week, as melting permafrost seeped into the vault's access corridor. While the seeds were in no danger, the flooding is nevertheless a worrying sign at a facility meant to endure the worst this planet can throw at it. The list of vault improvements includes a ditch to divert me

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A trek to base camp at Mount Everest will leave you short of breath in a hurry. A push to the summit begins in thin air, 17,000 feet above sea level — higher than any peak in the Rocky Mountains. Once you reach the "Death Zone," above 26,000 feet, oxygen levels drop to a third of what they are at sea level. Few climbers reach the summit, which rises 29,029 feet above sea level, without bottled oxygen. To acclimate their bodies to diminishing oxygen levels, climbers ascend Mt. Everest i

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Zika spread undetected into Brazil and Florida, a genetic study suggests.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbes">life & evolution/microbes</category>

Brain responses to emotion stimuli are highly variable even within the same individual, and this could be a problem for researchers who seek to use these responses as biomarkers to help diagnose and treat disorders such as depression. That's according to a new paper in Neuroimage, from University College London neuroscientists Camilla Nord and colleagues. Nord et al. had 29 volunteers perform three tasks during fMRI scanning. All of the tasks involved pictures of emotional faces, which

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

High-speed video shows that tiny parrots direct their hops to use the least amount of energy necessary.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>

Infants prescribed proton-pump inhibitors for reflux disease may be at higher risk for broken bones later on.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/child-development">growth curve/child development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health-0">growth curve/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve">growth curve</category>

Flamingos’ built-in tricks for balance might have a thing or two to teach standing robots or prosthesis makers someday.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category>

In the last few decades, scientists have come to appreciate the incredible creatures living on the reefs that lie just below conventional diving limits in what is called the mesophotic zone. These incredible biodiversity hotspots are home to more endemic species than shallower reefs, and conservationists are hopeful they may serve as refuges—pockets of relatively pristine habitat out of reach of anthropogenic stressors—where species under threat from pollution, overfishing, and even the effe

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Flamingos are striking not only for their brilliant pink plumes, but for how they often stand on a single slender leg, even when asleep. Now scientists find that standing on one leg may counter-intuitively require less effort for flamingos than standing on two. It's a finding that could help lead to more stable legged robots and better prosthetic legs. The One-Legged Problem One prior explanation for the mystery of why flamingos stand on one leg is that it conserved body heat, as doing

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

By Dr. Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher Caren Cooper. (2016). Citizen Science: How Ordinary People Are Changing the Face of Discovery. Overlook Press: New York, NY. $28.95. While publications proliferate on the subject of citizen science, an introduction to inform and delight all readers has been conspicuously absent until Caren Cooper’s new book, Citizen Science: How Ordinary People Are Changing the Face of Discovery hit the shelves this spring. In the pages of Citizen Science we find compelling

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Follow-up observations of TRAPPIST-1 and its seven planets reveals details about the outermost one.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/planetary-science">atom & cosmos/planetary science</category>

Stone Age tool’s route to Syrian site covered at least 700 kilometers.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-evolution">humans & society/human evolution</category>

No matter how flamboyant your shower curtain mold is, it couldn't have competed with the fungus that won this year's Agar Art contest. This is the third year the American Society for Microbiology has run the contest, asking for "works that are at their core an organism(s) growing on agar." The artwork can be any kind of microbe colonizing any size or shape of petri dish. This year's winner, Jasmine Temple, used yeast to create this image of a sunset over the water: Temple is a lab

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Before they were born, these mice were astronauts. Or, rather, the sperm that would go on to deliver half of their genetic material were. For nine months, mouse sperm was kept aboard the International Space Station, freeze-dried to preserve it. Brought back to Earth, the sperm was rehydrated, introduced to an egg and allowed to divide for about 20 days. The resulting mouse pups carry the distinction of having traveled perhaps the farthest distance ever on their way to being born. Sperm I

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Sperm freeze-dried and sent into space for months of exposure to high levels of solar radiation later produced healthy baby mice.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/development">genes & cells/development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Statins did not reduce heart attacks, coronary heart disease deaths or deaths from any cause in people age 65 and older, a new analysis finds.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

With new analyses of Graecopithecus fossils from Greece and Bulgaria, researchers argue for possible hominid origins in Europe, not Africa.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-evolution">humans & society/human evolution</category>

A study of nearly 80,000 people turns up 40 genes that may have a role in making brains smarter.

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Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category>

Mmmmm.... chocolate! It's not just the flavor that makes is so delicious, it's also the rich texture in your mouth. But what factors lead to that smooth film that coats your mouth when you eat chocolate? If you think it's simply melted cocoa butter, think again! According to this study, properties of both the chocolate and your saliva contribute to the "lubrication" of the chocolate as you chew it. These scientists measured the physical properties of molten chocolate mixed with either saliva

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A study of opioid prescriptions for sprained ankles finds that patients prescribed 30 or more pills are more likely to seek refills.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

The wavelike behavior of quantum particles could be harnessed to move atoms.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/quantum-physics">matter & energy/quantum physics</category>


Astronomers are cracking the secrets of our solar system within the oldest rocks — on Earth and beyond.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The Antarctic Peninsula's largest ice shelf has a 70-mile-long crack in it; scientists are watching closely.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine



A marathoner completes a race through the Borneo rainforest, then pays the price with a deadly ailment.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

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Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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