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The truth is out there, but if it doesn’t come from “my side” who cares? In an era of “fake news” our relationship status with factual knowledge, and a shared reality has changed to “it’s complicated”. Democracies depend on informed populations, but objective truth has of late taken a back seat to partisanship. In an essay published in Cell Press Reviews, New York University psychologists Jay Van Bavel and Andrea Pereira attempt to demystify how partisan bias has skewed the pursuit of tru

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A newly crafted artificial eye could help researchers study treatments for dry eye disease and other ailments.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/cells">genes & cells/cells</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

Mr. Steven is expected to save SpaceX millions of dollars. Mr. Steven, by the way, is a giant boat with a net. Building and launching reliable rockets into space is a costly endeavor, and SpaceX has been hellbent on bringing those costs down since the rocket company...launched. Until recently, spent rockets could only be used once. But Elon Musk, CEO and founder of SpaceX, has proven rockets are reusable, and can coordinate a simultaneous landing. But the cost-cutting can go even further.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Organoids, made from human stem cells, are growing into brains and other miniorgans to help researchers study development

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/human-development">body & brain/human development</category>

See this little guy? He's just emerged into the world, but the appropriately-named Dumbo octopus is already taking his first flaps. Resemblance to a certain flying elephant notwithstanding, Dumbo octopuses actually live far below the ocean's surface. They're some of the deepest-living octopuses, and are so rare that this is the first hatchling that was caught on camera. The "ears" are actually fins that help them to swan about the seafloor. Stretch Your Wings They belong to a sub-order

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

If crime-predicting computer programs aren’t any more accurate than human guesswork, do they still have a place in the criminal justice system?

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/computing">math & technology/computing</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public">science & the public</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Ah, nothing beats the crispy crunch of a jellyfish chip. Wait, what? Forget "Lady Doritos," jellyfish chips are a future snack for the masses. It turns out that the swimming gelatinous invertebrates can be leached of water to leave behind a thin, crispy wafer. It tastes of sea salt, apparently. Crispy, Crunchy News of the delicacy first appeared last summer, when Mie Pedersen, a gastrophysicist from the University of Southern Denmark announced that she and her team had found a new way

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

We here at Seriously, Science? really respect roaches. Not only do rambling roaches require receivers to run 'round roadblocks, but recently, researchers reproduced resourceful running of roaches to rapidly reorient running robots by ramming right into restrictions rather than retarding and reorienting. Never mind, just watch these videos of cockroaches running into things. It will help you relax. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwI6FBiBUVw[/embed] [embed]https://www.youtube.com/wat

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Cacao trees are really fussy about pollination.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/agriculture">earth & environment/agriculture</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/plants">life & evolution/plants</category>

In this cruel world, it's impossible to navigate from cradle to grave without experiencing the bitter fruits of injustice. But bitter fruits, it turns out, are better shared. According to findings from a study published Monday in the journal JNeurosci, punishing the wrongdoer seems to be more rewarding than helping out the victim. The participants, 53 males (a bit skewed, I'd say), all played a two-player game designed to analyze how people perceive and respond to a thief. Each player — t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Today, Indonesia's Sinabung had its biggest blast in its nearly 5 years of eruptions. I reported on the initial reports of the blast and now we have some pretty stunning images from space on the eruption. It really captures the power of the blast and how the ash spread mainly to the north over Sumatra (rather than the west as predicted). Sinabung appears to have settled down since the explosion, but with this change of character, volcanologists will be looking for signs if this change will b

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Scott and Mark Kelly are identical twin brothers. Though that alone does not make them unique, what does is the fact that they are also both astronauts. In order to take advantage of the Kellys’ unique situation, NASA scientists decided to conduct a detailed study on the twins, aimed at unraveling how nature versus nurture plays out in space. As part of NASA's Twins Study, researchers collected biological samples from each of the Kellys before sending Scott to the International Space Stat

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In the wake of the Valentine’s Day shooting at a Broward County, Florida high school, a familiar trope has reemerged: Often, when a young man is the shooter, people try to blame the tragedy on violent video games and other forms of media. Florida lawmaker Jared Moskowitz made the connection the day after the shooting, saying the gunman “was prepared to pick off students like it’s a video game.” In January, after two students were killed and many others wounded by a 15-year-old shooter in

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A museum exhibit showcases what modern analytical tools can reveal about ancient Egyptian funerary portraits and mummies.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

The alloys used to cast Picasso’s bronze sculptures provide a valuable piece of the puzzle in reconstructing the histories of the works of art.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Sinabung has been erupting for almost 5 years now, mostly producing moderate explosions that generate pyroclastic flows. These flows roar down the slopes of the volcano -- sometimes catching people in their paths. On February 19, 2018, the volcano decided to change its tune and unleashed a massive explosion that potentially reached at least 23,000 and possibly to up 55,000 feet (~16.5 kilometers), making it the largest eruption since the volcano became active again in 2013. ⚠️VIDEO | Impa

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Meanwhile, ice losses elsewhere allowed a Russian tanker to make the first ever independent winter crossing of the Arctic The Bering Sea off Alaska's west coast has just experienced a shocking loss of ice over a 10-day period — in winter. See the graph below for the details. To my eye it looks like sea ice extent declined from about 420,000 square kilometers on Feb. 6 to about 260,000 square kilometers on the 16th. That's a drop of 38 percent (and an area of lost ice a little smal

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Very young babies who have strokes in the language centers of their brain can recover normal language function — in the other side of their brain.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

By: Hope Henderson Through the atrium of an Oakland, CA community center, and down a narrow, paint-spattered hallway, sits Counter Culture Labs (CCL). This bocce-ball-court-turned-research-laboratory has been the east bay home for citizen science and biohacking since 2012. Ongoing projects at CCL include the Real Vegan Cheese project, which is programming yeast to produce milk proteins that can be turned into “real” cheese. Open Insulin aims to develop an open source protocol to produce a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Writing in the journal Medical Care, researcher Lisa I. Iezzoni says that a peer reviewer on a paper she previously submitted to that journal displayed "explicitly disparaging language and erroneous derogatory assumptions" about disabled people. Iezzoni's paper, which was eventually rejected, was about a survey of Massachusetts Medicaid recipients with either serious mental illness or significant physical disability. The survey involved a questionnaire asking about their experiences w

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

New wearable electronics that monitor swallowing and speech could aid rehabilitation therapy for stroke patients.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biophysics">life & evolution/biophysics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category>

When we talk about spaceflight -- modern or vintage, manned or unmanned, orbital or deep space -- launch vehicles all serve the same purpose: overcome gravity and get the payload off the Earth. Whatever the mission, it starts with a rocket launch. Even, because I can hear you asking about it, payloads that were launched from the payload bay of the space shuttle; that payload got to orbit via a shuttle launch. And because all rockets harness the same technology, they all share one common elem

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Hurricane Maria, it’s safe to say, was devastating to Puerto Rico. More than five months ago, on September 20th, the Category 4 storm ravaged the U.S. territory, causing $90 billion worth of damage in some estimates and scores of deaths. Much of the island is still without power. As someone born and raised on the island (despite my gringo name), it’s been hard to watch, and keeping in touch with family still there has been difficult, especially right after the storm. But part of what make

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

If there’s a highway to hell, there’s probably a gate to hell—well, there is. It's located in what was the ancient Greco-Roman city of Hierapolis, which is now in modern-day Turkey. Called Plutonium after Pluto, the gate was thought to be an opening to the underworld. It was first described by the ancient Greek geographer Strabo and Roman author Plinius. When Strabo visited, he described a thick vapor that would overtake the gate. During religious ceremonies, the castrated priests who ent

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Americans would probably take the discovery of extraterrestrial microbes pretty well.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astrobiology">atom & cosmos/astrobiology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbiology">genes & cells/microbiology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

I mean, really. No matter how you feel about the man, surely his mother is off-limits? Translated from the Latin, the full name of this species comes out to be "Attenborough's mother fish." Attenborough's mother — a fish! Where I come from, them's fightin' words. But the name is quite accurate. Hot takes aside, the fossil of Materpiscis attenboroughi actually turns out to contain the oldest vertebrate pregnancy we've ever found. It sets in stone the ancient roots of live birth, and the "m

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

For well over 1,500 years, humanity accepted that Earth was the center of the solar system. After all, the Bible—which was the scientific authority at the time—said this was so. Then along came Nicolaus Copernicus, who in the 16th century dared to challenge the church and mathematically described a solar system with the sun at its center. After his death, Galileo Galilei’s observations of heavenly bodies further supported the Copernican model. The Catholic Church, fearing such a finding u

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

On February 6, SpaceX wrote a new chapter in the ongoing book on commercial spaceflight with the successful launch of its Falcon Heavy rocket. Along for the ride was Musk’s red Tesla Roadster, which is now on an elliptical orbit around the Sun. But what about the risk to Earth? Could the car, which is estimated to last up to a few tens of millions of years, ever pose the threat of raining down from the sky as a fireball in the future? The answer, as it turns out, is probably not. A

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Termite-hunting ants have their own version of combat medicine for injured nest mates.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category>


To keep time to a song, the brain relies on a region used to plan movement — even when you’re not tapping along.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/clinical-trials">body & brain/clinical trials</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

Prevailing winds can send northern fur seal pups on an epic journey.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

A study of smog in the Los Angeles valley finds that paints, fragrances and other everyday items are a growing component of the problem.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/chemistry">matter & energy/chemistry</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

Fossilized footprints found in South Korea could be the earliest evidence of two-legged running in lizards.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

Only small numbers of Bornean orangutans will survive coming decades, researchers say.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/conservation">life & evolution/conservation</category>

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Scientists say carbon and nitrogen isotopes found in penguin tissues can indicate shifts in the Antarctic environment.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category>

A popular tale about rabbit domestication turns out to be fiction.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/archaeology">humans & society/archaeology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category>

Inhibiting an enzyme involved in the production of Alzheimer’s protein globs also made old globs, or plaques, disappear in mouse brains.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

Scientists performed the first quantum algorithms in silicon, and probed quantum bits with light.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/quantum-physics">matter & energy/quantum physics</category>


Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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