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Hey girl. You've probably seen those Ryan Gosling memes floating around the interwebs--you know, the ones where he says all the things girls like to hear. Well, these scientists set out to see if memes can garner more than just a laugh, and investigated whether they could actually change people's views on important subjects. To do so, they showed groups of men and women a variety of Ryan Gosling feminist memes, and then tested whether the memes had any effect on the participants' feminist belief

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

50 years ago, the effects of chronic marijuana smoking on mental health were hazy. They still are.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/psychology">humans & society/psychology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Thanks to a dummy we now have a better idea of what happens when a drone hits a person’s head. A study by researchers at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) one of the Federal Aviation Administration’s UAS (unmanned aircraft systems) test sites, suggests that commercial-sized drones can cause a wide range of injuries to people on the ground. In the United States, drone flights over people are not permitted. However, the FAA has been entertaining widespre

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Analyses of titanium in rock suggest plate tectonics began 500 million years earlier than thought.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Though his life was short — he never reached the age of 8 — his fossil remains could have far-reaching influence in hominin research. A paper to be published Friday in Science reveals the discovery of the well-preserved skeleton of a Neanderthal boy who lived in Spain 49,000 years ago. The researchers discuss the fits and starts of adolescent growth for our biological cousins, leading to insights into the evolutionary development of Homo sapiens. Dental evidence reveals that the boy wa

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

20 hours ago
Bees, sharks, anteaters, humans, we all share the need for sleep. Why we do it is of course still largely a mystery, but the fact of it remains incontrovertible. Now, new research on jellyfish is pushing the origin of sleep even further back down the evolutionary tree, before even the appearance of brains. It's long been known that any creature with a central nervous system needs to sleep, but jellyfish are effectively brainless. They do have neurons arranged into a "nerve net" throughout

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the hottest topics in astronomy right now. These short but extremely powerful bursts last only milliseconds, but release tremendous amounts of energy during that minute period of time. Since publication of their initial discovery in 2007 (the burst itself occurred in 2001), just over 25 of these sources have been identified, with only one repeater. But now, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics astronomers have estimated that despite only the handful

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The biggest cosmic ray haul ever points toward other galaxies as the source of the rays, not our own.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/particle-physics">atom & cosmos/particle physics</category>

Like many people, I was first introduced to the world of archaeology by Indiana Jones, that adventuresome character who lit up the big screen rescuing artifacts from villains by the skin of his teeth. Indy was awesome and will always have a place in my heart. But while he succeeded in making archaeology seem romantic, I never understood why it was important or believed I could join the adventure until I was introduced (via the small screen) to a real life archaeologist named Sarah Parcak.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Where there’s a will, there’s a way, and hackers have plenty of will and countless ways to attack a secure network—even if it’s not connected to the internet. In the latest demonstration proving no network is safe, researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev used security cameras equipped with night vision to send and receive data from a network that wasn’t even connected to the internet. Firewalls, intrusion detection and prevention systems… Jumping the Gap Organizations with

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

The countryside near Perm in the Soviet Union was rocketed by what sounded like an explosion in the afternoon of March 25, 1961. A capsule was falling from the sky, and before it hit the ground an ejection seat shot out, sending a passenger to a soft landing not far away. When recovery crews and volunteer helpers finally reached the landing site they rushed to the lifeless figure lying on the snowy ground, eyes wide open staring at nothing in the distance. One man punched the body in the fac

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A great irony about Africa is that, even though it's the birthplace of our species, we know almost nothing about the prehistoric populations who lived there: the bands of hunter gatherers who moved across the massive continent, interacting with and sometimes replacing other groups. Today that changes. Thanks to new research that includes the oldest African DNA ever successfully read, we're seeing Africa's prehistory like never before. Archaeologists and paleogeneticists are finally sta

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Last month was among the very warmest on record, according to two new analyses – and the heat is very likely to continue. With less than four months left to go in 2017,  the year will probably come in as second or third warmest on record. Two agencies have produced very slightly different verdicts for this past August. NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies has found that last month was the second warmest August globally in 137 years of modern record-keeping, surpassed only by Augu

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Like that vegetarian friend of yours who sneaks a piece of bacon when no one's looking, it appears that at least some dinosaurs previously thought to be dedicated herbivores occasionally consumed critters. That's at least according to new research that involved getting up close and investigative with those goldmines of lifestyle information: coprolites. Researchers took a look at fossilized feces from more than 15 separate deposits within the Kaiparowits Formation of Utah. The Kaiparowi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Scientists studying dinosaur poop found that some duck-billed dinos cheated on their vegetarian diets by snacking on crustaceans.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>

From Harvey to Maria, this year’s powerful hurricanes are giving scientists’ latest forecasting tools a trial by fire.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/earth">earth & environment/earth</category>

Resting beneath the 1,000-foot cliffs of Scotland’s Aonach’s Beag mountain range, The Sphinx –one of the country’s proudest snowcaps—is on its deathbed. “It’s a very sorry sight,” says Iain Cameron, a leading snow expert and arguably one of Edinburgh’s most dedicated “snow patchers,” a group of people who seek out and track the changes in the island’s coldest landmarks. These patches “tend to sit in the little gullies and corries below the peaks,” Cameron told Atlas Obscura. The Sphinx, w

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

You’re bombarded with sensory information every day — sights, sounds, smells, touches and tastes. A constant barrage that your brain has to manage, deciding which information to trust or which sense to use as a backup when another fails. Understanding how the brain evaluates and juggles all this input could be the key to designing better therapies for patients recovering from stroke, nerve injuries, or other conditions. It could also help engineers build more realistic virtual experiences fo

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, has been a jumping-off point to our understanding of galaxies throughout the universe. And though our picture of that home galaxy has evolved over time as astronomers have developed better ways to catalog and map its contents, we’ve largely believed the Milky Way was a “typical” example of a spiral galaxy. Now, astronomers are taking steps to determine whether that's really true. New data from the Satellites Around Galactic Analogs (SAGA) Survey is reshapin

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A small dot on an old piece of birch bark marks one of the biggest events in the history of mathematics. The bark is actually part of an ancient Indian mathematical document known as the Bakhshali manuscript. And the dot is the first known recorded use of the number zero. What’s more, researchers from the University of Oxford recently discovered the document is 500 years older than was previously estimated, dating to the third or fourth century – a breakthrough discovery. Today, it’s

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A newly discovered hermit crab takes its cue from peanut worms and uses walking corals as a permanent shelter.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/ecology">life & evolution/ecology</category>

A duo or trio of powerful antibodies was effective at stopping an HIV-like infection in lab monkeys, two studies find.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/biomedicine">body & brain/biomedicine</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/immune-science">genes & cells/immune science</category>

Dating is a tough game. No matter where you go, it seems like there's always someone who's more attractive, funnier or remembers to shower. Losing out sucks, but hey, at least you get to keep your penis. Not so for ruddy ducks. They only grow penises during mating season, and when forced to compete for mates, the scrawnier ducks don't even bother to put in much effort. Some ruddy ducks can grow penises that measure up to seven inches in length, but the weaker among them seem to put off se

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

In groundbreaking research, CRISPR/Cas9 used to study human development for the first time.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/development">genes & cells/development</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Readers have questions about miniature spacecraft project and Canaanite genealogy.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/astronomy">atom & cosmos/astronomy</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/anthropology">humans & society/anthropology</category>

Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses how nature can inspire people to make long-lasting change.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/technology">math & technology/technology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/humans-society-other">humans & society/humans & society</category>

New lab technologies that let bats fly freely allow scientists to track nerve cell signals as the animals dodge and weave.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/neuroscience">body & brain/neuroscience</category>

The way bats navigate their environs inspires engineers to develop better sonar and robots that can estimate crop yield or deliver packages

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category>

A new study suggests that older barn owls hear just as well as younger ones.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker">science ticker</category>

Wild beer studies are teaching scientists and brewers about the tropical fruit smell and sour taste of success.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/genetics">genes & cells/genetics</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbiology">genes & cells/microbiology</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>

Air pollution levels have come down since the 1970s, but smog is being linked with a growing list of diseases, including dementia, obesity, diabetes and even Parkinson’s.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/pollution">earth & environment/pollution</category>

Algae that give snow a red tint are making glacial snow in Alaska melt faster.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/climate">earth & environment/climate</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/microbes">life & evolution/microbes</category>

Analysis of specimens from China implies ray-finned fishes evolved later than previously thought.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/animals">life & evolution/animals</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/evolution">life & evolution/evolution</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/paleontology">life & evolution/paleontology</category>


A new book takes a hard look at the chicken industry for its role in fostering antibiotic resistance.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/agriculture">earth & environment/agriculture</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/health">body & brain/health</category> <category domain="https://www.sciencenews.org/topic/science-society">humans & society/science & society</category>




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A skeptic grapples with her spiritual experience, religious upbringing and the workings of the brain.

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Analysis of the ancient man's DNA reveal he had European ancestry.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: mitochondria, human migration, human ancestors, genetics, genetic, gene, evolution, european history, dna, current events, ancient rome, history

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading →

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: pathogens, medicine, health, bugs, bacteria, earth

A Japanese aquarium said it had hatched two Humboldt penguin chicks, the first time the technique has been successfully deployed for the species.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: penguins, japan, humboldt penguins, breeding, artificial insemination, animal breeding

Neanderthals built some of the world's earliest constructions, which were just found deep in a French cave.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: current events, evolution, anthropology, early man, early humans, human migration, human evolution, human ancestors, neanderthal

Adding 4G service to the laptop would making getting online easier, especially when Wi-Fi connection was spotty.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: wifi, macbooks, laptops, apple, 4g, tech

When Mars was a wet world, did its oceans experience powerful tsunamis spawned by meteorite impacts?

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: water, tsunamis, tsunami, satellites, red planet, mars water, mars, current events, ancient mars, space


Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: airplanes, airlines, turbulence, currents, jet streams, air, travel, fears, emotions

Farmed Atlantic salmon often suffer from such high levels of stress and depression that many become lethargic and essentially give up on life, finds new research.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: depression, marine life, sea life, fishing, fish

Supermassive black holes occupy all known galaxies, but astronomers have little idea how they formed. Now space telescopes have found a clue.

Source Feed: Discovery News
Categories: supermassive black holes, spitzer space telescope, hubble space telescope, hubble, galaxies, current events, chandra x-ray observatory, black hole, space

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