Science News RSS Feed

Science News

Get the latest scientific news and information on new discoveries.
Feed created by csharpfrog
178


Head-bobbing might make pigeons look ridiculous, but there's a practical purpose behind this very strange display.

Source Feed: Livescience.com




Imagine a world where mountains grow so high, they poke through the upper atmosphere and create a rocky maze for pilots to navigate.

Source Feed: Livescience.com



The dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569 is frantically forming stars. New research shows that some dwarf galaxies, however, have had their star formation halted by the supermassive black hole in their center. (Credit: HST/NASA/ESA) Astronomers know that most galaxies house supermassive black holes in their centers, from the largest galaxies down to small dwarfs. They also know that when supermassive black holes are actively feeding, they can slow or even stop the formation of stars in their home

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


A plume of steam flows upward from Bogoslof volcano, a partially submerged volcano that created giant underwater bubbles when it erupted in 2017. (Credit: Dave Withrow, Alaska Volcano Observatory) (Inside Science) -- As a geophysicist at the Alaska Volcano Observatory, John Lyons spends much of his days trying to decipher the music of volcanic eruptions. Sensitive microphones scattered across the Aleutian Arc -- a chain of over 80 volcanoes that sweeps westward from the Alaskan peninsula --

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Fat can accumulate in some insidious places in the body, including your lungs, a new study finds.

Source Feed: Livescience.com


(Credit: Y. Mitsuma's tracing of the photographs of H. Hayakawa) Astronomers have watched sunspots come and go on the sun’s surface for at least 400 years. But to learn about the history of the sun’s activity before the time of telescopes, they have to turn to historical references to phenomena linked to solar activity, like the northern lights. Now, a team of scientists have discovered what may be the oldest written records of auroras to date. These three Assyrian and Babylonian cuneifo

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Odua Images/Shutterstock) Scan the aisles of any grocery store, and you’ll find a plethora of infant formula options, all designed to meet the nutrient needs of growing infants, who nearly triple their body weight in the first year of life. And yet researchers and companies are busy testing new formulations all the time. That’s in part because much has changed in our understanding of breast milk’s complexities over the decades — from early knowledge of its nutrient composition to

Source Feed: Discover Magazine




The cryosphere is critical to Earth and its inhabitants, but it is vanishing as the planet warms.

Source Feed: Livescience.com

Food allergies, including those to seafood, are becoming more common. (Credit: Alexander Raths/Shutterstock) All your life, you’ve delighted in the subtle, sweet taste of fresh shrimp. Until one day, when you bite into it and find yourself beset by itching hives and a swollen throat. An unexpected food allergy seems to be a common experience for some adults in America, according to a recent study. Though the issue is often associated with children, researchers found that 1 in 10 grown-ups

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Advertisement

You might want to reconsider including activated charcoal in your food, beverages or cosmetics.

Source Feed: Livescience.com

Nearly three dozen people have died from vaping-related lung illnesses as the nationwide outbreak that continues to grow.

Source Feed: Livescience.com

These two new spacesuits will help the space agency put astronauts back on the surface of the Moon, enhance their mobility, and keep them safe along the way. (Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky) NASA revealed two new spacesuits this week that may be worn by astronauts on future missions to the Moon. The suits feature a number of improvements from the Apollo era spacesuits used on the last Moon missions 50 years ago. The two new suits were shown off by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine during a

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Humpback whale populations have recovered since whaling was banned, some from near extinction. (Credit: Tomas Kotouc/Shutterstock) In the late 1950s, only 440 humpback whales — or 1.6 percent of their onetime number — were swimming around the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Thanks to whaling restrictions, these school bus-sized aquatic mammals have started to come back. Now, a new paper estimates that the western South Atlantic whales have recovered even better than scientists previously th

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Gas "waterfalls" cascade onto a forming planet in this artist's illustration. (Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF, S. Dagnello) Stars and their planetary systems are born from clouds of gas and dust that collapse into swirling disks. Astronomers can’t directly see planets forming in these disks because they're hidden in all the debris. But in the past few years, new kinds of telescopes have started to reveal gaps in disks around young stars where planets might be forming. Now, astronomers have seen ga

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Two common proteins begin to spread through the brains of those with Alzheimer's. Despite decades of study, scientists still don't understand why they become so dangerous. (Credit: SpeedKingz/Shutterstock) If you look at the brain of an Alzheimer's patient, you’ll see clear and undeniable damage. Clusters of dead nerve cells. Hard plaques cemented between cells and thick tangles of proteins twisted up inside the cells themselves. These are the hallmarks of Alzheimer's, and they drive

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Nearly half a billion years ago, trilobites may have been capable of some kinds of collective behavior associated with modern animals. (Credit: Vannier et al 2019, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51012-3) Chains of trilobite fossils unearthed in Morocco suggest that these early arthropods were capable of a collective behavior seen in many of today's species — only these trilobites had the conga line down about 480 million years ago. Modern vertebrates and invertebrates alike engag

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Natural short sleepers seem to have won the genetic lottery, which allows them to thrive on very little sleep. (Credit: Shutterstock) Your sleep needs are probably influenced by your genes.It’s a new way of thinking about sleep that's gaining steam, thanks to a rare group of people known as natural short sleepers, or those who can function normally on less than six hours of sleep a night. And now, a team of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco — who identified the fi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Saharan silver ants. The insects can move at blistering speeds across fiery desert sands. (Credit: Pavel Krasensky/Shutterstock) Around noon each day in the Sahara Desert, silver ants emerge from their underground nests. Despite this being the hottest part of the day, they come out to scavenge dead insects, which are most likely to drop dead when sand temperatures can reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 degrees Celsius). The ants have to be quick, though. Their prey is scarce, and they have lot

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Kids these days, amiright? (Credit: aastock/Shutterstock) Ugh. Kids these days. They've got no respect. They dress all weird. They're always on their phones. And don't get me started on their music! Versions of this argument have echoed through editorials, taverns, hair salons and Roman bathhouses for millennia. Kids these days just aren't what they used to be. To hear the various ills of youth, one might well think that Western civilization has been in decline since it started. T

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Our feline companions can pass parasites, pathogens and more on to us. (Credit: Lario/Shutterstock) A good snuggle with a cat can improve anyone’s day — well, assuming you don’t have allergies. But like any other animal, our domestic felines can carry diseases, and sometimes those illnesses pass to us. Updated guidelines from the American Association of Feline Practitioners include a list of which diseases cat owners might be at risk for. Zoonotic Worries The 36 diseases listed

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Caster Semenya (right) competes during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Semenya filed a discrimination lawsuit against the International Association of Athletics Federations, challenging a rule that female athletes' testosterone levels must be below a certain limit. (Credit: CP DC Press/Shutterstock) New research finds that women with boosted testosterone levels develop more lean muscle mass and can run longer before getting tired. Though some researchers and activists think t

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

(Credit: Britney Schmidt/Dead Pixel VFX/Univ. of Texas at Austin) Europa, one of Jupiter’s four largest moons, has an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy crust. In the coming years, scientists hope to send probes to the world to study the chemistry of its ocean and look for possible signs of alien life. One challenge is figuring out whether radiation hitting Europa would tamper with potential chemical evidence of life.  Luckily, it seems scientists won’t have to worry too much about thi

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Boeing's Starliner capsule. (Credit: NASA) NASA has confirmed that the aerospace company Boeing is pushing forward with their new Starliner crew capsule, which aims to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2020. But before the craft is deemed fit to carry a crew, it still must clear two critical tests. The first test — the Pad Abort Test — will ensure the craft's escape system works as expected during an emergency on the launch pad. That test is set to take place on

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Particle collisions event simulation at 13,000 GeV in the CMS, a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider. (Credit: CERN) (Inside Science) -- In 2012, particle physicists detected the long-sought-after Higgs boson for the first time. This particle was the last missing puzzle piece of what physicists call the Standard Model -- the most thoroughly tested set of physical laws that govern our universe. The Higgs discovery was made possible by a giant machine in Europe, known as the

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

Today, insect eating is on the rise. Did our ancestors chow down on the critters, too? (Credit: CK Bangkok Photography/Shutterstock) Anticipating food shortages in coming decades, some companies are touting insects as tomorrow’s protein source. Entrepreneurs are jumping on board and chips made of crickets are hitting grocery shelves. But scientists advise caution, saying more research is needed on the environmental impact of rearing insects at an industrial scale. As sustainability exper

Source Feed: Discover Magazine

A very weak paper in PNAS has attracted some attention lately: An experimental test of the ovulatory homolog model of female orgasm The paper aims to be a test of the hypothesis that the human female orgasm is a kind of evolutionary relic from an earlier stage in evolution. In humans, ovulation happens on a monthly cycle and is not related to sexual activity. However, in some mammal species, such as rabbits, ovulation is triggered by sex (or copulation, as biologists say). In the new

Source Feed: Discover Magazine


Nerve cells in an important memory center in the brain sync their firing and create fast ripples of activity seconds before a recollection resurfaces.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: body & brain/health, body & brain/neuroscience



Nerve cells in the brain that are tied to wakefulness are destroyed in people with Alzheimer’s, a finding that may refocus dementia research.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: body & brain/biomedicine, body & brain/health, body & brain/neuroscience



Science News’ forthcoming website won’t feature comment sections on stories, but instead will invite e-mail feedback so readers can make their voices heard.

Source Feed: Latest Headlines | Science News
Categories: transparency project



RSS Feed Subscribe to this Feed via RSS reader.

Related Feeds
Business      Music News      Cognitive Science      world news      U.S. Politics      PakApNews      Today's Headlines      Country Music News      Jobs in New York City     

Advertisement